What can we learn from consumption-based carbon footprints at different spatial scales? Review of policy implications

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What can we learn from consumption-based carbon footprints at different spatial scales? Review of policy implications. / Ottelin, Juudit; Ala-Mantila, Sanna; Heinonen, Jukka; Wiedmann, Thomas; Clarke, Jack; Junnila, Seppo.

julkaisussa: Environmental Research Letters, Vuosikerta 14, Nro 9, 093001, 09.2019.

Tutkimustuotos: Lehtiartikkelivertaisarvioitu

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@article{2c35eea1b4a04a1ba43669217a24cce2,
title = "What can we learn from consumption-based carbon footprints at different spatial scales? Review of policy implications",
abstract = "Background: Current climate change mitigation policies, including the Paris Agreement, are based on territorial greenhouse gas (GHG) accounting. This neglects the understanding of GHG emissions embodied in trade. As a solution, consumption-based accounting (CBA) that reveals the lifecycle emissions, including transboundary flows, is gaining support as a complementary information tool. CBA is particularly relevant in cities that tend to outsource a large part of their production-based emissions to their hinterlands. While CBA has so far been used relatively little in practical policymaking, it has been used widely by scientists. Methods and design: The purpose of this systematic review, which covers more than 100 studies, is to reflect the policy implications of consumption-based carbon footprint (CBCF) studies at different spatial scales. The review was conducted by reading through the discussion sections of the reviewed studies and systematically collecting the given policy suggestions for different spatial scales. We used both numerical and qualitative methods to organize and interpret the findings of the review. Review results and discussion: The motivation for the review was to investigate whether the unique consumption perspective of CBA leads to similarly unique policy features. We found that various carbon pricing policies are the most widely supported policy instrument in the relevant literature. However, overall, there is a shortage of discussion on policy instruments, since the policy discussions focus on policy outcomes, such as behavioral change or technological solutions. In addition, some policy recommendations are conflicting. Particularly, urban density and compact city policies are supported by some studies and questioned by others. To clarify the issue, we examined how the results regarding the relationship between urban development and the CBCF vary. The review provides a concise starting point for policymakers and future research by summarizing the timely policy implications.",
keywords = "carbon footprint, input-output, consumption-based, policy, review, spatial scale, city, GREENHOUSE-GAS EMISSIONS, CLIMATE-CHANGE MITIGATION, INPUT-OUTPUT-ANALYSIS, ENVIRONMENTAL-IMPACT, DIOXIDE EMISSIONS, HOUSEHOLD CONSUMPTION, ECONOMIC-DEVELOPMENT, US HOUSEHOLDS, CO2 EMISSIONS, LIFE-STYLE",
author = "Juudit Ottelin and Sanna Ala-Mantila and Jukka Heinonen and Thomas Wiedmann and Jack Clarke and Seppo Junnila",
year = "2019",
month = "9",
doi = "10.1088/1748-9326/ab2212",
language = "English",
volume = "14",
journal = "Environmental Research Letters",
issn = "1748-9326",
publisher = "IOP Publishing",
number = "9",

}

RIS - Lataa

TY - JOUR

T1 - What can we learn from consumption-based carbon footprints at different spatial scales? Review of policy implications

AU - Ottelin, Juudit

AU - Ala-Mantila, Sanna

AU - Heinonen, Jukka

AU - Wiedmann, Thomas

AU - Clarke, Jack

AU - Junnila, Seppo

PY - 2019/9

Y1 - 2019/9

N2 - Background: Current climate change mitigation policies, including the Paris Agreement, are based on territorial greenhouse gas (GHG) accounting. This neglects the understanding of GHG emissions embodied in trade. As a solution, consumption-based accounting (CBA) that reveals the lifecycle emissions, including transboundary flows, is gaining support as a complementary information tool. CBA is particularly relevant in cities that tend to outsource a large part of their production-based emissions to their hinterlands. While CBA has so far been used relatively little in practical policymaking, it has been used widely by scientists. Methods and design: The purpose of this systematic review, which covers more than 100 studies, is to reflect the policy implications of consumption-based carbon footprint (CBCF) studies at different spatial scales. The review was conducted by reading through the discussion sections of the reviewed studies and systematically collecting the given policy suggestions for different spatial scales. We used both numerical and qualitative methods to organize and interpret the findings of the review. Review results and discussion: The motivation for the review was to investigate whether the unique consumption perspective of CBA leads to similarly unique policy features. We found that various carbon pricing policies are the most widely supported policy instrument in the relevant literature. However, overall, there is a shortage of discussion on policy instruments, since the policy discussions focus on policy outcomes, such as behavioral change or technological solutions. In addition, some policy recommendations are conflicting. Particularly, urban density and compact city policies are supported by some studies and questioned by others. To clarify the issue, we examined how the results regarding the relationship between urban development and the CBCF vary. The review provides a concise starting point for policymakers and future research by summarizing the timely policy implications.

AB - Background: Current climate change mitigation policies, including the Paris Agreement, are based on territorial greenhouse gas (GHG) accounting. This neglects the understanding of GHG emissions embodied in trade. As a solution, consumption-based accounting (CBA) that reveals the lifecycle emissions, including transboundary flows, is gaining support as a complementary information tool. CBA is particularly relevant in cities that tend to outsource a large part of their production-based emissions to their hinterlands. While CBA has so far been used relatively little in practical policymaking, it has been used widely by scientists. Methods and design: The purpose of this systematic review, which covers more than 100 studies, is to reflect the policy implications of consumption-based carbon footprint (CBCF) studies at different spatial scales. The review was conducted by reading through the discussion sections of the reviewed studies and systematically collecting the given policy suggestions for different spatial scales. We used both numerical and qualitative methods to organize and interpret the findings of the review. Review results and discussion: The motivation for the review was to investigate whether the unique consumption perspective of CBA leads to similarly unique policy features. We found that various carbon pricing policies are the most widely supported policy instrument in the relevant literature. However, overall, there is a shortage of discussion on policy instruments, since the policy discussions focus on policy outcomes, such as behavioral change or technological solutions. In addition, some policy recommendations are conflicting. Particularly, urban density and compact city policies are supported by some studies and questioned by others. To clarify the issue, we examined how the results regarding the relationship between urban development and the CBCF vary. The review provides a concise starting point for policymakers and future research by summarizing the timely policy implications.

KW - carbon footprint

KW - input-output

KW - consumption-based

KW - policy

KW - review

KW - spatial scale

KW - city

KW - GREENHOUSE-GAS EMISSIONS

KW - CLIMATE-CHANGE MITIGATION

KW - INPUT-OUTPUT-ANALYSIS

KW - ENVIRONMENTAL-IMPACT

KW - DIOXIDE EMISSIONS

KW - HOUSEHOLD CONSUMPTION

KW - ECONOMIC-DEVELOPMENT

KW - US HOUSEHOLDS

KW - CO2 EMISSIONS

KW - LIFE-STYLE

U2 - 10.1088/1748-9326/ab2212

DO - 10.1088/1748-9326/ab2212

M3 - Review Article

VL - 14

JO - Environmental Research Letters

JF - Environmental Research Letters

SN - 1748-9326

IS - 9

M1 - 093001

ER -

ID: 36608434