The effect of fuel on high velocity evaporating fuel sprays: Large-Eddy simulation of Spray A with various fuels

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@article{f0f9dae339794eaeb737a58d35c492ce,
title = "The effect of fuel on high velocity evaporating fuel sprays: Large-Eddy simulation of Spray A with various fuels",
abstract = "Lagrangian particle tracking and Large-Eddy simulation were used to assess the effect of different fuels on spray characteristics. In such a two-way coupled modeling scenario, spray momentum accelerates the gaseous phase into an intense, multiphase jet near the nozzle. To assess fuel property effects on liquid spray formation, the non-reacting Engine Combustion Network Spray A baseline condition was chosen as the reference case. The validated Spray A case was modified by replacing n-dodecane with diesel, methanol, dimethyl ether, or propane assuming 150 MPa injection pressure. The model features and performance for various fuels in the under-resolved near-nozzle region are discussed. The main findings of the paper are as follows. (1) We show that, in addition to the well-known liquid penetration (Formula presented.), and vapor penetration (Formula presented.), for all the investigated fuels, the modeled multiphase jets exhibit also a third length scale (Formula presented.), with discussed correspondence to a potential core part common to single phase jets. (2) As a characteristic feature of the present model, (Formula presented.) is noted to correlate linearly with (Formula presented.) and (Formula presented.) for all the fuels. (3) A separate sensitivity test on density variation indicated that the liquid density had a relatively minor role on (Formula presented.). (4) Significant dependency between fuel oxygen content and the equivalence ratio (Formula presented.) distribution was observed. (5) Repeated simulations indicated injection-to-injection variations below 2{\%} for (Formula presented.) and 4{\%} for (Formula presented.). In the absence of experimental and fully resolved numerical near-nozzle velocity data, the exact details of (Formula presented.) remain as an open question. In contrast, fuel property effects on spray development have been consistently explained herein.",
keywords = "Engine Combustion Network, fuel comparison, Lagrangian particle tracking, Large-Eddy simulation, liquid length, Spray A",
author = "Kaario, {Ossi Tapani} and Ville Vuorinen and Heikki Kahila and Im, {Hong G.} and Martti Larmi",
note = "| openaire: EC/H2020/634135/EU//HERCULES-2",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
day = "19",
doi = "10.1177/1468087419854235",
language = "English",
journal = "International Journal of Engine Research",
issn = "1468-0874",
publisher = "SAGE Publications Ltd",

}

RIS - Lataa

TY - JOUR

T1 - The effect of fuel on high velocity evaporating fuel sprays

T2 - Large-Eddy simulation of Spray A with various fuels

AU - Kaario, Ossi Tapani

AU - Vuorinen, Ville

AU - Kahila, Heikki

AU - Im, Hong G.

AU - Larmi, Martti

N1 - | openaire: EC/H2020/634135/EU//HERCULES-2

PY - 2019/6/19

Y1 - 2019/6/19

N2 - Lagrangian particle tracking and Large-Eddy simulation were used to assess the effect of different fuels on spray characteristics. In such a two-way coupled modeling scenario, spray momentum accelerates the gaseous phase into an intense, multiphase jet near the nozzle. To assess fuel property effects on liquid spray formation, the non-reacting Engine Combustion Network Spray A baseline condition was chosen as the reference case. The validated Spray A case was modified by replacing n-dodecane with diesel, methanol, dimethyl ether, or propane assuming 150 MPa injection pressure. The model features and performance for various fuels in the under-resolved near-nozzle region are discussed. The main findings of the paper are as follows. (1) We show that, in addition to the well-known liquid penetration (Formula presented.), and vapor penetration (Formula presented.), for all the investigated fuels, the modeled multiphase jets exhibit also a third length scale (Formula presented.), with discussed correspondence to a potential core part common to single phase jets. (2) As a characteristic feature of the present model, (Formula presented.) is noted to correlate linearly with (Formula presented.) and (Formula presented.) for all the fuels. (3) A separate sensitivity test on density variation indicated that the liquid density had a relatively minor role on (Formula presented.). (4) Significant dependency between fuel oxygen content and the equivalence ratio (Formula presented.) distribution was observed. (5) Repeated simulations indicated injection-to-injection variations below 2% for (Formula presented.) and 4% for (Formula presented.). In the absence of experimental and fully resolved numerical near-nozzle velocity data, the exact details of (Formula presented.) remain as an open question. In contrast, fuel property effects on spray development have been consistently explained herein.

AB - Lagrangian particle tracking and Large-Eddy simulation were used to assess the effect of different fuels on spray characteristics. In such a two-way coupled modeling scenario, spray momentum accelerates the gaseous phase into an intense, multiphase jet near the nozzle. To assess fuel property effects on liquid spray formation, the non-reacting Engine Combustion Network Spray A baseline condition was chosen as the reference case. The validated Spray A case was modified by replacing n-dodecane with diesel, methanol, dimethyl ether, or propane assuming 150 MPa injection pressure. The model features and performance for various fuels in the under-resolved near-nozzle region are discussed. The main findings of the paper are as follows. (1) We show that, in addition to the well-known liquid penetration (Formula presented.), and vapor penetration (Formula presented.), for all the investigated fuels, the modeled multiphase jets exhibit also a third length scale (Formula presented.), with discussed correspondence to a potential core part common to single phase jets. (2) As a characteristic feature of the present model, (Formula presented.) is noted to correlate linearly with (Formula presented.) and (Formula presented.) for all the fuels. (3) A separate sensitivity test on density variation indicated that the liquid density had a relatively minor role on (Formula presented.). (4) Significant dependency between fuel oxygen content and the equivalence ratio (Formula presented.) distribution was observed. (5) Repeated simulations indicated injection-to-injection variations below 2% for (Formula presented.) and 4% for (Formula presented.). In the absence of experimental and fully resolved numerical near-nozzle velocity data, the exact details of (Formula presented.) remain as an open question. In contrast, fuel property effects on spray development have been consistently explained herein.

KW - Engine Combustion Network

KW - fuel comparison

KW - Lagrangian particle tracking

KW - Large-Eddy simulation

KW - liquid length

KW - Spray A

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85068091613&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1177/1468087419854235

DO - 10.1177/1468087419854235

M3 - Review Article

JO - International Journal of Engine Research

JF - International Journal of Engine Research

SN - 1468-0874

ER -

ID: 35665298