Secular rise in economically valuable personality traits

Markus Jokela, Tuomas Pekkarinen, Matti Sarvimäki*, Marko Terviö, Roope Uusitalo

*Tämän työn vastaava kirjoittaja

Tutkimustuotos: LehtiartikkeliArticleScientificvertaisarvioitu

11 Sitaatiot (Scopus)

Abstrakti

Although trends in many physical characteristics and cognitive capabilities of modern humans are well-documented, less is known about how personality traits have evolved over time. We analyze data from a standardized personality test administered to 79% of Finnish men born between 1962 and 1976 (n = 419, 523) and find steady increases in personality traits that predict higher income in later life. The magnitudes of these trends are similar to the simultaneous increase in cognitive abilities, at 0.2-0.6 SD during the 15-y window. When anchored to earnings, the change in personality traits amounts to a 12% increase. Both personality and cognitive ability have consistent associations with family background, but the trends are similar across groups defined by parental income, parental education, number of siblings, and rural/urban status. Nevertheless, much of the trends in test scores can be attributed to changes in the family background composition, namely 33% for personality and 64% for cognitive ability. These composition effects are mostly due to improvements in parents' education. We conclude that there is a "Flynn effect" for personality that mirrors the original Flynn effect for cognitive ability in magnitude and practical significance but is less driven by compositional changes in family background.

AlkuperäiskieliEnglanti
Sivut6527-6532
Sivumäärä6
JulkaisuProceedings of the National Academy of Sciences of the United States of America
Vuosikerta114
Numero25
DOI - pysyväislinkit
TilaJulkaistu - 20 kesäkuuta 2017
OKM-julkaisutyyppiA1 Julkaistu artikkeli, soviteltu

Sormenjälki Sukella tutkimusaiheisiin 'Secular rise in economically valuable personality traits'. Ne muodostavat yhdessä ainutlaatuisen sormenjäljen.

  • Siteeraa tätä