On The Teachers Role in Interactive Prototyping

Tutkimustuotos: Artikkeli kirjassa/konferenssijulkaisussavertaisarvioitu

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On The Teachers Role in Interactive Prototyping. / Mikkonen, Jussi.

Design for Next: Proceedings of the 12th European Academy of Design Conference. toim. / Loredana Di Lucchio; Lorenzo Imbesi; Paul Atkinson. 2017. s. S1212-S1223 (The Design Journal; Vuosikerta 20, Nro Supplement 1).

Tutkimustuotos: Artikkeli kirjassa/konferenssijulkaisussavertaisarvioitu

Harvard

Mikkonen, J 2017, On The Teachers Role in Interactive Prototyping. julkaisussa L Di Lucchio, L Imbesi & P Atkinson (toim), Design for Next: Proceedings of the 12th European Academy of Design Conference. The Design Journal, Nro Supplement 1, Vuosikerta. 20, Sivut S1212-S1223, Rome, Italia, 12/04/2017. https://doi.org/10.1080/14606925.2017.1352651

APA

Mikkonen, J. (2017). On The Teachers Role in Interactive Prototyping. teoksessa L. Di Lucchio, L. Imbesi, & P. Atkinson (Toimittajat), Design for Next: Proceedings of the 12th European Academy of Design Conference (Sivut S1212-S1223). (The Design Journal; Vuosikerta 20, Nro Supplement 1). https://doi.org/10.1080/14606925.2017.1352651

Vancouver

Mikkonen J. On The Teachers Role in Interactive Prototyping. julkaisussa Di Lucchio L, Imbesi L, Atkinson P, toimittajat, Design for Next: Proceedings of the 12th European Academy of Design Conference. 2017. s. S1212-S1223. (The Design Journal; Supplement 1). https://doi.org/10.1080/14606925.2017.1352651

Author

Mikkonen, Jussi. / On The Teachers Role in Interactive Prototyping. Design for Next: Proceedings of the 12th European Academy of Design Conference. Toimittaja / Loredana Di Lucchio ; Lorenzo Imbesi ; Paul Atkinson. 2017. Sivut S1212-S1223 (The Design Journal; Supplement 1).

Bibtex - Lataa

@inproceedings{3ec295fbd2764878b4399f5ad203d8d0,
title = "On The Teachers Role in Interactive Prototyping",
abstract = "The industrial design students are increasingly involved with the development of functional interactable prototypes. There is complexity in both the concept generation and the implementation, something that the design students need to be able to cope with. We approach the prototyping in the light of representing a design idea, moving from concept towards a physical manifestation, and discuss the concept-imposed minimum towards the complexity of a prototype. While a combination of methods, such as cardboard-mockups, and wizard-of-oz can be used to evaluate simpler design ideas, they simply fall short with a complex device, as there are too many things happening. Thus, an approach is needed for developing complex prototypes. We examine five different prototypes, and discuss the role of the teacher in each. Drawing from the concept, prototyping practice, and the required complexity, we suggest stages of complexity for the development, and a more active participation from the teacher.",
keywords = "interaction design, prototyping, complexity, education, teacher",
author = "Jussi Mikkonen",
year = "2017",
month = "4",
day = "14",
doi = "10.1080/14606925.2017.1352651",
language = "English",
series = "The Design Journal",
number = "Supplement 1",
pages = "S1212--S1223",
editor = "{Di Lucchio}, Loredana and Lorenzo Imbesi and Paul Atkinson",
booktitle = "Design for Next",

}

RIS - Lataa

TY - GEN

T1 - On The Teachers Role in Interactive Prototyping

AU - Mikkonen, Jussi

PY - 2017/4/14

Y1 - 2017/4/14

N2 - The industrial design students are increasingly involved with the development of functional interactable prototypes. There is complexity in both the concept generation and the implementation, something that the design students need to be able to cope with. We approach the prototyping in the light of representing a design idea, moving from concept towards a physical manifestation, and discuss the concept-imposed minimum towards the complexity of a prototype. While a combination of methods, such as cardboard-mockups, and wizard-of-oz can be used to evaluate simpler design ideas, they simply fall short with a complex device, as there are too many things happening. Thus, an approach is needed for developing complex prototypes. We examine five different prototypes, and discuss the role of the teacher in each. Drawing from the concept, prototyping practice, and the required complexity, we suggest stages of complexity for the development, and a more active participation from the teacher.

AB - The industrial design students are increasingly involved with the development of functional interactable prototypes. There is complexity in both the concept generation and the implementation, something that the design students need to be able to cope with. We approach the prototyping in the light of representing a design idea, moving from concept towards a physical manifestation, and discuss the concept-imposed minimum towards the complexity of a prototype. While a combination of methods, such as cardboard-mockups, and wizard-of-oz can be used to evaluate simpler design ideas, they simply fall short with a complex device, as there are too many things happening. Thus, an approach is needed for developing complex prototypes. We examine five different prototypes, and discuss the role of the teacher in each. Drawing from the concept, prototyping practice, and the required complexity, we suggest stages of complexity for the development, and a more active participation from the teacher.

KW - interaction design

KW - prototyping

KW - complexity

KW - education

KW - teacher

U2 - 10.1080/14606925.2017.1352651

DO - 10.1080/14606925.2017.1352651

M3 - Conference contribution

T3 - The Design Journal

SP - S1212-S1223

BT - Design for Next

A2 - Di Lucchio, Loredana

A2 - Imbesi, Lorenzo

A2 - Atkinson, Paul

ER -

ID: 11718903