Negativity Bias in Media Multitasking: The Effects of Negative Social Media Messages on Attention to Television News Broadcasts

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Negativity Bias in Media Multitasking : The Effects of Negative Social Media Messages on Attention to Television News Broadcasts. / Kätsyri, Jari; Kinnunen, Juha; Kusumoto, Kenta; Oittinen, Pirkko; Ravaja, Jaakko.

julkaisussa: PloS one, Vuosikerta 11, Nro 5, 0153712, 04.05.2016.

Tutkimustuotos: Lehtiartikkelivertaisarvioitu

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Bibtex - Lataa

@article{8f8dca028dd142bd842bcb65ed651a5e,
title = "Negativity Bias in Media Multitasking: The Effects of Negative Social Media Messages on Attention to Television News Broadcasts",
abstract = "Television viewers' attention is increasingly more often divided between television and {"}second screens{"}, for example when viewing television broadcasts and following their related social media discussion on a tablet computer. The attentional costs of such multitasking may vary depending on the ebb and flow of the social media channel, such as its emotional contents. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that negative social media messages would draw more attention than similar positive messages. Specifically, news broadcasts were presented in isolation and with simultaneous positive or negative Twitter messages on a tablet to 38 participants in a controlled experiment. Recognition memory, gaze tracking, cardiac responses, and self-reports were used as attentional indices. The presence of any tweets on the tablet decreased attention to the news broadcasts. As expected, negative tweets drew longer viewing times and elicited more attention to themselves than positive tweets. Negative tweets did not, however, decrease attention to the news broadcasts. Taken together, the present results demonstrate a negativity bias exists for social media messages in media multitasking; however, this effect does not amplify the overall detrimental effects of media multitasking.",
keywords = "IMAGE MOTION, SMALL SCREEN, MEMORY, RESPONSES, EMOTION, PERFORMANCE, CAPACITY, AROUSAL, CONTEXT",
author = "Jari K{\"a}tsyri and Juha Kinnunen and Kenta Kusumoto and Pirkko Oittinen and Jaakko Ravaja",
year = "2016",
month = "5",
day = "4",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0153712",
language = "English",
volume = "11",
journal = "PloS one",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "5",

}

RIS - Lataa

TY - JOUR

T1 - Negativity Bias in Media Multitasking

T2 - The Effects of Negative Social Media Messages on Attention to Television News Broadcasts

AU - Kätsyri, Jari

AU - Kinnunen, Juha

AU - Kusumoto, Kenta

AU - Oittinen, Pirkko

AU - Ravaja, Jaakko

PY - 2016/5/4

Y1 - 2016/5/4

N2 - Television viewers' attention is increasingly more often divided between television and "second screens", for example when viewing television broadcasts and following their related social media discussion on a tablet computer. The attentional costs of such multitasking may vary depending on the ebb and flow of the social media channel, such as its emotional contents. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that negative social media messages would draw more attention than similar positive messages. Specifically, news broadcasts were presented in isolation and with simultaneous positive or negative Twitter messages on a tablet to 38 participants in a controlled experiment. Recognition memory, gaze tracking, cardiac responses, and self-reports were used as attentional indices. The presence of any tweets on the tablet decreased attention to the news broadcasts. As expected, negative tweets drew longer viewing times and elicited more attention to themselves than positive tweets. Negative tweets did not, however, decrease attention to the news broadcasts. Taken together, the present results demonstrate a negativity bias exists for social media messages in media multitasking; however, this effect does not amplify the overall detrimental effects of media multitasking.

AB - Television viewers' attention is increasingly more often divided between television and "second screens", for example when viewing television broadcasts and following their related social media discussion on a tablet computer. The attentional costs of such multitasking may vary depending on the ebb and flow of the social media channel, such as its emotional contents. In the present study, we tested the hypothesis that negative social media messages would draw more attention than similar positive messages. Specifically, news broadcasts were presented in isolation and with simultaneous positive or negative Twitter messages on a tablet to 38 participants in a controlled experiment. Recognition memory, gaze tracking, cardiac responses, and self-reports were used as attentional indices. The presence of any tweets on the tablet decreased attention to the news broadcasts. As expected, negative tweets drew longer viewing times and elicited more attention to themselves than positive tweets. Negative tweets did not, however, decrease attention to the news broadcasts. Taken together, the present results demonstrate a negativity bias exists for social media messages in media multitasking; however, this effect does not amplify the overall detrimental effects of media multitasking.

KW - IMAGE MOTION

KW - SMALL SCREEN

KW - MEMORY

KW - RESPONSES

KW - EMOTION

KW - PERFORMANCE

KW - CAPACITY

KW - AROUSAL

KW - CONTEXT

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0153712

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0153712

M3 - Article

VL - 11

JO - PloS one

JF - PloS one

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 5

M1 - 0153712

ER -

ID: 3243458