Interaction of the effects associated with auditory-motor integration and attention-engaging listening tasks

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Interaction of the effects associated with auditory-motor integration and attention-engaging listening tasks. / Wikman, Patrik; Rinne, Teemu.

julkaisussa: Neuropsychologia, Vuosikerta 124, 18.02.2019, s. 322-336.

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Wikman, Patrik ; Rinne, Teemu. / Interaction of the effects associated with auditory-motor integration and attention-engaging listening tasks. Julkaisussa: Neuropsychologia. 2019 ; Vuosikerta 124. Sivut 322-336.

Bibtex - Lataa

@article{874c61ffe6e942a9b45b3b7b129518a5,
title = "Interaction of the effects associated with auditory-motor integration and attention-engaging listening tasks",
abstract = "A number of previous studies have implicated regions in posterior auditory cortex (AC) in auditory-motor integration during speech production. Other studies, in turn, have shown that activation in AC and adjacent regions in the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) is strongly modulated during active listening and depends on task requirements. The present fMRI study investigated whether auditory-motor effects interact with those related to active listening tasks in AC and IPL. In separate task blocks, our subjects performed either auditory discrimination or 2-back memory tasks on phonemic or nonphonemic vowels. They responded to targets by either overtly repeating the last vowel of a target pair, overtly producing a given response vowel, or by pressing a response button. We hypothesized that the requirements for auditory-motor integration, and the associated activation, would be stronger during repetition than production responses and during repetition of nonphonemic than phonemic vowels. We also hypothesized that if auditory-motor effects are independent of task-dependent modulations, then the auditory-motor effects should not differ during discrimination and 2-back tasks. We found that activation in AC and IPL was significantly modulated by task (discrimination vs. 2-back), vocal-response type (repetition vs. production), and motor-response type (vocal vs. button). Motor-response and task effects interacted in IPL but not in AC. Overall, the results support the view that regions in posterior AC are important in auditory-motor integration. However, the present study shows that activation in wide AC and IPL regions is modulated by the motor requirements of active listening tasks in a more general manner. Further, the results suggest that activation modulations in AC associated with attention-engaging listening tasks and those associated with auditory-motor performance are mediated by independent mechanisms.",
keywords = "Attention, Auditory cortex, Inferior parietal lobule, Speech production, Speech repetition",
author = "Patrik Wikman and Teemu Rinne",
year = "2019",
month = "2",
day = "18",
doi = "10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.11.006",
language = "English",
volume = "124",
pages = "322--336",
journal = "Neuropsychologia",
issn = "0028-3932",

}

RIS - Lataa

TY - JOUR

T1 - Interaction of the effects associated with auditory-motor integration and attention-engaging listening tasks

AU - Wikman, Patrik

AU - Rinne, Teemu

PY - 2019/2/18

Y1 - 2019/2/18

N2 - A number of previous studies have implicated regions in posterior auditory cortex (AC) in auditory-motor integration during speech production. Other studies, in turn, have shown that activation in AC and adjacent regions in the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) is strongly modulated during active listening and depends on task requirements. The present fMRI study investigated whether auditory-motor effects interact with those related to active listening tasks in AC and IPL. In separate task blocks, our subjects performed either auditory discrimination or 2-back memory tasks on phonemic or nonphonemic vowels. They responded to targets by either overtly repeating the last vowel of a target pair, overtly producing a given response vowel, or by pressing a response button. We hypothesized that the requirements for auditory-motor integration, and the associated activation, would be stronger during repetition than production responses and during repetition of nonphonemic than phonemic vowels. We also hypothesized that if auditory-motor effects are independent of task-dependent modulations, then the auditory-motor effects should not differ during discrimination and 2-back tasks. We found that activation in AC and IPL was significantly modulated by task (discrimination vs. 2-back), vocal-response type (repetition vs. production), and motor-response type (vocal vs. button). Motor-response and task effects interacted in IPL but not in AC. Overall, the results support the view that regions in posterior AC are important in auditory-motor integration. However, the present study shows that activation in wide AC and IPL regions is modulated by the motor requirements of active listening tasks in a more general manner. Further, the results suggest that activation modulations in AC associated with attention-engaging listening tasks and those associated with auditory-motor performance are mediated by independent mechanisms.

AB - A number of previous studies have implicated regions in posterior auditory cortex (AC) in auditory-motor integration during speech production. Other studies, in turn, have shown that activation in AC and adjacent regions in the inferior parietal lobule (IPL) is strongly modulated during active listening and depends on task requirements. The present fMRI study investigated whether auditory-motor effects interact with those related to active listening tasks in AC and IPL. In separate task blocks, our subjects performed either auditory discrimination or 2-back memory tasks on phonemic or nonphonemic vowels. They responded to targets by either overtly repeating the last vowel of a target pair, overtly producing a given response vowel, or by pressing a response button. We hypothesized that the requirements for auditory-motor integration, and the associated activation, would be stronger during repetition than production responses and during repetition of nonphonemic than phonemic vowels. We also hypothesized that if auditory-motor effects are independent of task-dependent modulations, then the auditory-motor effects should not differ during discrimination and 2-back tasks. We found that activation in AC and IPL was significantly modulated by task (discrimination vs. 2-back), vocal-response type (repetition vs. production), and motor-response type (vocal vs. button). Motor-response and task effects interacted in IPL but not in AC. Overall, the results support the view that regions in posterior AC are important in auditory-motor integration. However, the present study shows that activation in wide AC and IPL regions is modulated by the motor requirements of active listening tasks in a more general manner. Further, the results suggest that activation modulations in AC associated with attention-engaging listening tasks and those associated with auditory-motor performance are mediated by independent mechanisms.

KW - Attention

KW - Auditory cortex

KW - Inferior parietal lobule

KW - Speech production

KW - Speech repetition

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85059297442&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.11.006

DO - 10.1016/j.neuropsychologia.2018.11.006

M3 - Article

VL - 124

SP - 322

EP - 336

JO - Neuropsychologia

JF - Neuropsychologia

SN - 0028-3932

ER -

ID: 31090120