Functional connectivity of intrinsic cognitive networks during resting state and task performance in preadolescent children

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Functional connectivity of intrinsic cognitive networks during resting state and task performance in preadolescent children. / Jiang, Ping; Vuontela, Virve; Tokariev, Maksym; Lin, Hai; Aronen, Eeva T.; Ma, Yuan Ye; Carlson, Synnöve.

julkaisussa: PloS one, Vuosikerta 13, Nro 10, e0205690, 01.10.2018, s. 1-24.

Tutkimustuotos: Lehtiartikkelivertaisarvioitu

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@article{657c70b220e24ba7b13a4280f06806ce,
title = "Functional connectivity of intrinsic cognitive networks during resting state and task performance in preadolescent children",
abstract = "Earlier studies on adults have shown that functional connectivity (FC) of brain networks can vary depending on the brain state and cognitive challenge. Network connectivity has been investigated quite extensively in children in resting state, much less during tasks and is largely unexplored between these brain states. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging and independent component analysis to investigate the functional architecture of large-scale brain networks in 16 children (aged 7–11 years, 11 males) and 16 young adults (aged 22–29 years, 10 males) during resting state and visual working memory tasks. We identified the major neurocognitive intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) in both groups. Children had stronger FC than adults within the cingulo-opercular network in resting state, during task performance, and after controlling for performance differences. During tasks, children had stronger FC than adults also within the default mode (DMN) and right frontoparietal (rFPN) networks, and between the anterior DMN and the frontopolar network, whereas adults had stronger coupling between the anterior DMN and rFPN. Furthermore, children compared to adults modulated the FC strength regarding the rFPN differently between the brain states. The FC within the anterior DMN correlated with age and performance in children so that the younger they were, the stronger was the FC, and the stronger the FC within this network, the slower they performed the tasks. The group differences in the network connectivity reported here, and the observed correlations with task performance, provide insight into the normative development of the preadolescent brain and link maturation of functional connectivity with improving cognitive performance.",
author = "Ping Jiang and Virve Vuontela and Maksym Tokariev and Hai Lin and Aronen, {Eeva T.} and Ma, {Yuan Ye} and Synn{\"o}ve Carlson",
year = "2018",
month = "10",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1371/journal.pone.0205690",
language = "English",
volume = "13",
pages = "1--24",
journal = "PloS one",
issn = "1932-6203",
publisher = "Public Library of Science",
number = "10",

}

RIS - Lataa

TY - JOUR

T1 - Functional connectivity of intrinsic cognitive networks during resting state and task performance in preadolescent children

AU - Jiang, Ping

AU - Vuontela, Virve

AU - Tokariev, Maksym

AU - Lin, Hai

AU - Aronen, Eeva T.

AU - Ma, Yuan Ye

AU - Carlson, Synnöve

PY - 2018/10/1

Y1 - 2018/10/1

N2 - Earlier studies on adults have shown that functional connectivity (FC) of brain networks can vary depending on the brain state and cognitive challenge. Network connectivity has been investigated quite extensively in children in resting state, much less during tasks and is largely unexplored between these brain states. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging and independent component analysis to investigate the functional architecture of large-scale brain networks in 16 children (aged 7–11 years, 11 males) and 16 young adults (aged 22–29 years, 10 males) during resting state and visual working memory tasks. We identified the major neurocognitive intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) in both groups. Children had stronger FC than adults within the cingulo-opercular network in resting state, during task performance, and after controlling for performance differences. During tasks, children had stronger FC than adults also within the default mode (DMN) and right frontoparietal (rFPN) networks, and between the anterior DMN and the frontopolar network, whereas adults had stronger coupling between the anterior DMN and rFPN. Furthermore, children compared to adults modulated the FC strength regarding the rFPN differently between the brain states. The FC within the anterior DMN correlated with age and performance in children so that the younger they were, the stronger was the FC, and the stronger the FC within this network, the slower they performed the tasks. The group differences in the network connectivity reported here, and the observed correlations with task performance, provide insight into the normative development of the preadolescent brain and link maturation of functional connectivity with improving cognitive performance.

AB - Earlier studies on adults have shown that functional connectivity (FC) of brain networks can vary depending on the brain state and cognitive challenge. Network connectivity has been investigated quite extensively in children in resting state, much less during tasks and is largely unexplored between these brain states. Here we used functional magnetic resonance imaging and independent component analysis to investigate the functional architecture of large-scale brain networks in 16 children (aged 7–11 years, 11 males) and 16 young adults (aged 22–29 years, 10 males) during resting state and visual working memory tasks. We identified the major neurocognitive intrinsic connectivity networks (ICNs) in both groups. Children had stronger FC than adults within the cingulo-opercular network in resting state, during task performance, and after controlling for performance differences. During tasks, children had stronger FC than adults also within the default mode (DMN) and right frontoparietal (rFPN) networks, and between the anterior DMN and the frontopolar network, whereas adults had stronger coupling between the anterior DMN and rFPN. Furthermore, children compared to adults modulated the FC strength regarding the rFPN differently between the brain states. The FC within the anterior DMN correlated with age and performance in children so that the younger they were, the stronger was the FC, and the stronger the FC within this network, the slower they performed the tasks. The group differences in the network connectivity reported here, and the observed correlations with task performance, provide insight into the normative development of the preadolescent brain and link maturation of functional connectivity with improving cognitive performance.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85055074305&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1371/journal.pone.0205690

DO - 10.1371/journal.pone.0205690

M3 - Article

VL - 13

SP - 1

EP - 24

JO - PloS one

JF - PloS one

SN - 1932-6203

IS - 10

M1 - e0205690

ER -

ID: 29118329