When a one-hour time difference is too much: Temporal boundaries in global virtual work

Anu Sivunen, Niina Nurmi, Johanna Koroma

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientificpeer-review

4 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Coordinating across several time zones has been considered challenging in global collaboration, whereas small time differences have not received much attention in the literature. In this paper, we argue that instead of focusing on the time zone differences per se, temporal boundaries in global virtual work should be studied in terms of discontinuities and continuities. Drawing from organizational discontinuity theory, we argue that temporal boundaries are not symmetrical to global collaborators and, furthermore, that small time differences can sometimes be even more challenging than large time differences in global virtual work. Based on interview data from 93 participants from four different organizations, we show that the visibility of a temporal boundary (i.e., magnitude and direction of the time zone difference) and the physical, administrative, categorical, and individual characteristics related to temporality play important roles in how discontinuities emerge and how continuities are constructed in global virtual work.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 49th Annual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences, HICSS 2016
PublisherIEEE Computer Society
Pages511-520
Number of pages10
Volume2016-March
ISBN (Electronic)9780769556703
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 7 Mar 2016
MoE publication typeA4 Article in a conference publication
EventAnnual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences - Koloa, United States
Duration: 5 Jan 20168 Jan 2016
Conference number: 49

Conference

ConferenceAnnual Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences
Abbreviated titleHICSS
CountryUnited States
CityKoloa
Period05/01/201608/01/2016

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