Virtual machines vs. containers in cloud gaming systems

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientificpeer-review

Standard

Virtual machines vs. containers in cloud gaming systems. / Kämäräinen, Teemu; Shan, Yuanqi; Siekkinen, Matti; Ylä-Jääski, Antti.

Annual Workshop on Network and Systems Support for Games. Vol. 2016-January IEEE Computer Society, 2016. 7382987.

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientificpeer-review

Harvard

Kämäräinen, T, Shan, Y, Siekkinen, M & Ylä-Jääski, A 2016, Virtual machines vs. containers in cloud gaming systems. in Annual Workshop on Network and Systems Support for Games. vol. 2016-January, 7382987, IEEE Computer Society, International Workshop on Network and Systems Support for Games, Zagreb, Croatia, 03/12/2015. https://doi.org/10.1109/NetGames.2015.7382987

APA

Kämäräinen, T., Shan, Y., Siekkinen, M., & Ylä-Jääski, A. (2016). Virtual machines vs. containers in cloud gaming systems. In Annual Workshop on Network and Systems Support for Games (Vol. 2016-January). [7382987] IEEE Computer Society. https://doi.org/10.1109/NetGames.2015.7382987

Vancouver

Kämäräinen T, Shan Y, Siekkinen M, Ylä-Jääski A. Virtual machines vs. containers in cloud gaming systems. In Annual Workshop on Network and Systems Support for Games. Vol. 2016-January. IEEE Computer Society. 2016. 7382987 https://doi.org/10.1109/NetGames.2015.7382987

Author

Kämäräinen, Teemu ; Shan, Yuanqi ; Siekkinen, Matti ; Ylä-Jääski, Antti. / Virtual machines vs. containers in cloud gaming systems. Annual Workshop on Network and Systems Support for Games. Vol. 2016-January IEEE Computer Society, 2016.

Bibtex - Download

@inproceedings{4eb25228380a43a1bdfafbd1eac741f4,
title = "Virtual machines vs. containers in cloud gaming systems",
abstract = "In cloud gaming the game is rendered on a distant cloud server and the resulting video stream is sent back to the user who controls the game via a thin client. The high resource usage of cloud gaming servers is a challenge. Expensive hardware including GPUs have to be efficiently shared among multiple simultaneous users. The cloud servers use virtualization techniques to isolate users and share resources among dedicated servers. The traditional virtualization techniques can however inflict notable performance overhead limiting the user count for a single server. Operating-system-level virtualization instances known as containers are an emerging trend in cloud computing. Containers don't need to virtualize the entire operating system still providing most of the benefits of virtualization. In this paper, we evaluate the container-based alternative to traditional virtualization in cloud gaming systems through extensive experiments. We also discuss the differences needed in system implementation using the container approach and identify the existing limitations.",
author = "Teemu K{\"a}m{\"a}r{\"a}inen and Yuanqi Shan and Matti Siekkinen and Antti Yl{\"a}-J{\"a}{\"a}ski",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "13",
doi = "10.1109/NetGames.2015.7382987",
language = "English",
volume = "2016-January",
booktitle = "Annual Workshop on Network and Systems Support for Games",
publisher = "IEEE Computer Society",
address = "United States",

}

RIS - Download

TY - GEN

T1 - Virtual machines vs. containers in cloud gaming systems

AU - Kämäräinen, Teemu

AU - Shan, Yuanqi

AU - Siekkinen, Matti

AU - Ylä-Jääski, Antti

PY - 2016/1/13

Y1 - 2016/1/13

N2 - In cloud gaming the game is rendered on a distant cloud server and the resulting video stream is sent back to the user who controls the game via a thin client. The high resource usage of cloud gaming servers is a challenge. Expensive hardware including GPUs have to be efficiently shared among multiple simultaneous users. The cloud servers use virtualization techniques to isolate users and share resources among dedicated servers. The traditional virtualization techniques can however inflict notable performance overhead limiting the user count for a single server. Operating-system-level virtualization instances known as containers are an emerging trend in cloud computing. Containers don't need to virtualize the entire operating system still providing most of the benefits of virtualization. In this paper, we evaluate the container-based alternative to traditional virtualization in cloud gaming systems through extensive experiments. We also discuss the differences needed in system implementation using the container approach and identify the existing limitations.

AB - In cloud gaming the game is rendered on a distant cloud server and the resulting video stream is sent back to the user who controls the game via a thin client. The high resource usage of cloud gaming servers is a challenge. Expensive hardware including GPUs have to be efficiently shared among multiple simultaneous users. The cloud servers use virtualization techniques to isolate users and share resources among dedicated servers. The traditional virtualization techniques can however inflict notable performance overhead limiting the user count for a single server. Operating-system-level virtualization instances known as containers are an emerging trend in cloud computing. Containers don't need to virtualize the entire operating system still providing most of the benefits of virtualization. In this paper, we evaluate the container-based alternative to traditional virtualization in cloud gaming systems through extensive experiments. We also discuss the differences needed in system implementation using the container approach and identify the existing limitations.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=84964843300&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1109/NetGames.2015.7382987

DO - 10.1109/NetGames.2015.7382987

M3 - Conference contribution

VL - 2016-January

BT - Annual Workshop on Network and Systems Support for Games

PB - IEEE Computer Society

ER -

ID: 3338714