Velocity field and force distribution in an unconsolidated ice ridge penetrated by a ship

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Abstract

Estimating ship resistance in ice ridges requires an understanding of ridge failure processes. A three-dimensional discrete element method is used to study a ship passing through a small unconsolidated ridge with a triangular cross-section and the resulting velocity field and force distribution inside the ridge. The kinetic behavior of ice blocks within the ridge suggests a gradual failure process, not a sudden failure. The velocity field shows fast-moving ice blocks near the ship bow, and stationary or slow-moving blocks further away. Loads within the ridge were transmitted through force chains. No unique shear planes were observed.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the International Conference on Port and Ocean Engineering under Arctic Conditions (POAC)
PublisherInternational Conference on Port and Ocean Engineering under Arctic Conditions (POAC)
Number of pages8
Volume2023-June
Publication statusPublished - 2023
MoE publication typeA4 Conference publication
EventInternational Conference on Port and Ocean Engineering under Arctic Conditions - Glasgow, United Kingdom
Duration: 12 Jun 202316 Jun 2023
Conference number: 27

Publication series

NameProceedings of the International Conference on Port and Ocean Engineering under Arctic Conditions
PublisherInternational Conference on Port and Ocean Engineering under Arctic Conditions
ISSN (Print)0376-6756
ISSN (Electronic)2077-7841

Conference

ConferenceInternational Conference on Port and Ocean Engineering under Arctic Conditions
Abbreviated titlePOAC
Country/TerritoryUnited Kingdom
CityGlasgow
Period12/06/202316/06/2023

Keywords

  • Failure behavior
  • Force chain
  • Resistance
  • Ridge

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