Understanding player perceptions of RegnaTales, a mobile game for teaching social problem solving skills

Yoon Phaik Ooi, Dion Hoe Lian Goh, Elisa D. Mekler, Alexandre N. Tuch, Jillian Boon, Rebecca P. Ang, Daniel Fung, Jens Gaab

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientificpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Research on the use of serious games to support child and adolescent mental health interventions is in its early stages. Work is needed to provide evidence of the applicability and effectiveness of using such games in teaching children skills needed to overcome their behavioral and emotional problems. The present study adds to the knowledge in this area through the development and evaluation of RegnaTales, a mobile game for teaching social problem solving skills among children. The study examined the playability and usability of the mobile game among 12 children (mean age = 9.58; SD = 1.78) from international schools in Basel. Results showed that 76% of participants found the game fun and 58% would play it again. Our findings further highlight the potential of serious games in teaching skills needed to address anger feelings and provide support for its use in child and adolescent mental health interventions.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2016 Symposium on Applied Computing, SAC 2016
PublisherACM
Pages167-172
Number of pages6
ISBN (Electronic)9781450337397
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 4 Apr 2016
MoE publication typeA4 Article in a conference publication
EventACM Symposium On Applied Computing
- Pisa, Italy
Duration: 4 Apr 20168 Apr 2016
Conference number: 31

Conference

ConferenceACM Symposium On Applied Computing
Abbreviated titleSAC
CountryItaly
CityPisa
Period04/04/201608/04/2016

Keywords

  • Children
  • Curiosity
  • Fun/enjoyment
  • Game evaluation
  • Mental health
  • Mobile app
  • Playability
  • Serious games

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