Triblock Proteins with Weakly Dimerizing Terminal Blocks and an Intrinsically Disordered Region for Rational Design of Condensate Properties

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)

Abstract

Condensates are molecular assemblies that are formed through liquid–liquid phase separation and play important roles in many biological processes. The rational design of condensate formation and their properties is central to applications, such as biosynthetic materials, synthetic biology, and for understanding cell biology. Protein engineering is used to make a triblock structure with varying terminal blocks of folded proteins on both sides of an intrinsically disordered mid-region. Dissociation constants are determined in the range of micromolar to millimolar for a set of proteins suitable for use as terminal blocks. Varying the weak dimerization of terminal blocks leads to an adjustable tendency for condensate formation while keeping the intrinsically disordered region constant. The dissociation constants of the terminal domains correlate directly with the tendency to undergo liquid–liquid phase separation. Differences in physical properties, such as diffusion rate are not directly correlated with the strength of dimerization but can be understood from the properties and interplay of the constituent blocks. The work demonstrates the importance of weak interactions in condensate formation and shows a principle for protein design that will help in fabricating functional condensates in a predictable and rational way.

Original languageEnglish
Article number2306817
JournalSmall
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 14 Nov 2023
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Keywords

  • biomaterials
  • coacervate
  • liquid–liquid phase separation
  • protein dimer
  • protein engineering

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Triblock Proteins with Weakly Dimerizing Terminal Blocks and an Intrinsically Disordered Region for Rational Design of Condensate Properties'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this