Superstructured mesocrystals through multiple inherent molecular interactions for highly reversible sodium ion batteries

Xiaoling Qiu, Xiaoling Wang, Yunxiang He, Jieying Liang, Kang Liang, Blaise L. Tardy, Joseph J. Richardson, Ming Hu, Hao Wu*, Yun Zhang*, Orlando J. Rojas, Ian Manners, Junling Guo*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
17 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Soft structures in nature, such as supercoiled DNA and proteins, can organize into complex hierarchical architectures through multiple noncovalent molecular interactions. Identifying new classes of natural building blocks capable of facilitating long-range hierarchical structuring has remained an elusive goal. We report the bottom-up synthesis of a hierarchical metal-phenolic mesocrystal where self-assembly proceeds on different length scales in a spatiotemporally controlled manner. Phenolic-based coordination complexes organize into supramolecular threads that assemble into tertiary nanoscale filaments, lastly packing into quaternary mesocrystals. The hierarchically ordered structures are preserved after thermal conversion into a metal-carbon hybrid framework and can impart outstanding performance to sodium ion batteries, which affords a capability of 72.5 milliampere hours per gram at an ultrahigh rate of 200 amperes per gram and a 90% capacity retention over 15,000 cycles at a current density of 5.0 amperes per gram. This hierarchical structuring of natural polyphenols is expected to find widespread applications.

Original languageEnglish
Article numbereabh3482
Number of pages10
JournalScience Advances
Volume7
Issue number37
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 8 Sep 2021
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Keywords

  • HIGH-PERFORMANCE ANODES
  • LITHIUM-ION
  • BISMUTH
  • CARBON
  • NANOPARTICLES
  • COORDINATION
  • ORGANIZATION
  • NETWORK
  • SPHERES

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