Spontaneous sensorimotor cortical activity is suppressed by deep brain stimulation in patients with advanced Parkinson's disease

Jarkko Luoma, Eero Pekkonen, Katja Airaksinen, Liisa Helle, Jussi Nurminen, Samu Taulu, Jyrki P. Mäkelä*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

Advanced Parkinson's disease (PD) is characterized by an excessive oscillatory beta band activity in the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of STN alleviates motor symptoms in PD and suppresses the STN beta band activity. The effect of DBS on cortical sensorimotor activity is more ambiguous; both increases and decreases of beta band activity have been reported. Non-invasive studies with simultaneous DBS are problematic due to DBS-induced artifacts. We recorded magnetoencephalography (MEG) from 16 advanced PD patients with and without STN DBS during rest and wrist extension. The strong magnetic artifacts related to stimulation were removed by temporal signal space separation. MEG oscillatory activity at 5–25 Hz was suppressed during DBS in a widespread frontoparietal region, including the sensorimotor cortex identified by the cortico-muscular coherence. The strength of suppression did not correlate with clinical improvement. Our results indicate that alpha and beta band oscillations are suppressed at the frontoparietal cortex by STN DBS in PD.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)48-53
Number of pages6
JournalNeuroscience Letters
Volume683
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 14 Sep 2018
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Keywords

  • Advanced Parkinson's disease
  • Beta band suppression
  • Deep brain stimulation
  • Magnetoencephalography
  • Subthalamic nucleus

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