Split fuel injection and Miller cycle in a large-bore engine

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Split fuel injection and Miller cycle in a large-bore engine. / Imperato, Matteo; Kaario, Ossi; Sarjovaara, Teemu; Larmi, Martti.

In: Applied Energy, Vol. 162, 15.01.2016, p. 289-297.

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Imperato, Matteo ; Kaario, Ossi ; Sarjovaara, Teemu ; Larmi, Martti. / Split fuel injection and Miller cycle in a large-bore engine. In: Applied Energy. 2016 ; Vol. 162. pp. 289-297.

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@article{5da4dbd9ed5241ca97b01b8b8c8a9d1d,
title = "Split fuel injection and Miller cycle in a large-bore engine",
abstract = "The upcoming emission legislation for sea-going vessels issued by the international marine organization requires drastic reduction in nitric oxides. A well-known approach for meeting these requirements is to reduce the in-cylinder temperature prior to combustion by using the so-called Miller cycle. However, the mere use of this technique presents the actual limits due to long ignition delay, which occurs when the compression temperature is very low. As a consequence, premixed combustion develops quickly, increasing the local temperature in the combustion chamber and favoring NOx formation. Splitting the fuel injection into a small pilot and a main injection can reduce the magnitude of the premixed combustion and the local in-cylinder temperatures. The work presented here is divided in two parts and is novel by being the first systematic study of split injection combined with Miller cycle in large-bore engines. In its first stage, an extensive study of the injection dwell with two intake valve closings and three timings of the main injection are analyzed. In the second stage, both injection events are shifted later in the power stroke with fixed injection dwell. Overall, the pilot injection reduced the ignition delay but dropped the peak of the premixed combustion only with the most advanced intake valve closing. This improved fuel economy, but provided no advantages as far as emissions are concerned. In addition, while increasing injection dwell reduced NOx emissions, it also increased fuel consumption. The highest achieved NOx reduction was close to 60{\%}, with a small drawback in fuel economy. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.",
keywords = "Large-bore engine, Split injection, NOx reduction, Miller cycle, Pilot injection, Diesel combustion, DIESEL-ENGINE, NOX, REDUCTION, EMISSIONS, STRATEGY",
author = "Matteo Imperato and Ossi Kaario and Teemu Sarjovaara and Martti Larmi",
year = "2016",
month = "1",
day = "15",
doi = "10.1016/j.apenergy.2015.10.041",
language = "English",
volume = "162",
pages = "289--297",
journal = "Applied Energy",
issn = "0306-2619",

}

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Split fuel injection and Miller cycle in a large-bore engine

AU - Imperato, Matteo

AU - Kaario, Ossi

AU - Sarjovaara, Teemu

AU - Larmi, Martti

PY - 2016/1/15

Y1 - 2016/1/15

N2 - The upcoming emission legislation for sea-going vessels issued by the international marine organization requires drastic reduction in nitric oxides. A well-known approach for meeting these requirements is to reduce the in-cylinder temperature prior to combustion by using the so-called Miller cycle. However, the mere use of this technique presents the actual limits due to long ignition delay, which occurs when the compression temperature is very low. As a consequence, premixed combustion develops quickly, increasing the local temperature in the combustion chamber and favoring NOx formation. Splitting the fuel injection into a small pilot and a main injection can reduce the magnitude of the premixed combustion and the local in-cylinder temperatures. The work presented here is divided in two parts and is novel by being the first systematic study of split injection combined with Miller cycle in large-bore engines. In its first stage, an extensive study of the injection dwell with two intake valve closings and three timings of the main injection are analyzed. In the second stage, both injection events are shifted later in the power stroke with fixed injection dwell. Overall, the pilot injection reduced the ignition delay but dropped the peak of the premixed combustion only with the most advanced intake valve closing. This improved fuel economy, but provided no advantages as far as emissions are concerned. In addition, while increasing injection dwell reduced NOx emissions, it also increased fuel consumption. The highest achieved NOx reduction was close to 60%, with a small drawback in fuel economy. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

AB - The upcoming emission legislation for sea-going vessels issued by the international marine organization requires drastic reduction in nitric oxides. A well-known approach for meeting these requirements is to reduce the in-cylinder temperature prior to combustion by using the so-called Miller cycle. However, the mere use of this technique presents the actual limits due to long ignition delay, which occurs when the compression temperature is very low. As a consequence, premixed combustion develops quickly, increasing the local temperature in the combustion chamber and favoring NOx formation. Splitting the fuel injection into a small pilot and a main injection can reduce the magnitude of the premixed combustion and the local in-cylinder temperatures. The work presented here is divided in two parts and is novel by being the first systematic study of split injection combined with Miller cycle in large-bore engines. In its first stage, an extensive study of the injection dwell with two intake valve closings and three timings of the main injection are analyzed. In the second stage, both injection events are shifted later in the power stroke with fixed injection dwell. Overall, the pilot injection reduced the ignition delay but dropped the peak of the premixed combustion only with the most advanced intake valve closing. This improved fuel economy, but provided no advantages as far as emissions are concerned. In addition, while increasing injection dwell reduced NOx emissions, it also increased fuel consumption. The highest achieved NOx reduction was close to 60%, with a small drawback in fuel economy. (C) 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

KW - Large-bore engine

KW - Split injection

KW - NOx reduction

KW - Miller cycle

KW - Pilot injection

KW - Diesel combustion

KW - DIESEL-ENGINE

KW - NOX

KW - REDUCTION

KW - EMISSIONS

KW - STRATEGY

U2 - 10.1016/j.apenergy.2015.10.041

DO - 10.1016/j.apenergy.2015.10.041

M3 - Article

VL - 162

SP - 289

EP - 297

JO - Applied Energy

JF - Applied Energy

SN - 0306-2619

ER -

ID: 1519247