Social Play in an Exergame: How the Need to Belong Predicts Adherence

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientificpeer-review

Researchers

Research units

  • Queens Univ, Queens University - Canada, Biol
  • University of Victoria

Abstract

The general trend in exercise interventions, including those based on exergames, is to see high initial enthusiasm but significantly declining adherence. Social play is considered a core tenet of the design of exercise interventions help foster motivation to play. To determine whether social play aids in adherence to exergames, we analyzed data from a study involving five waves of six-week exergame trials between a single-player and multiplayer group. In this paper, we examine the multiplayer group to determine who might benefit from social play and why. We found that people who primarily engage in group play have superior adherence to people who primarily play alone. People who play alone in a multiplayer exergame have worse adherence than playing a single-player version, which can undo any potential benefit of social play. The primary construct distinguishing group versus alone players is their sense of program belonging. Program belonging is, thus, crucial to multiplayer exergame design.

Details

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCHI 2019: Proceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Publication statusPublished - 2019
MoE publication typeA4 Article in a conference publication
EventACM SIGCHI Annual Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Glasgow, United Kingdom
Duration: 4 May 20199 May 2019
https://chi2019.acm.org/

Conference

ConferenceACM SIGCHI Annual Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Abbreviated titleACM CHI
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityGlasgow
Period04/05/201909/05/2019
Internet address

    Research areas

  • Program belonging, exergames, social play, SELF-DETERMINATION THEORY, INTERACTIVE VIDEO BIKES, PHYSICAL-ACTIVITY, INTRINSIC MOTIVATION, EXERCISE ADHERENCE, HEALTH-BENEFITS, CHILDREN, YOUTH, PREFERENCES, EFFICACY

ID: 35996476