Seasonal and geographical impact on human resting periods

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Seasonal and geographical impact on human resting periods. / Monsivais-Velazquez, Daniel; Bhattacharya, Kunal; Ghosh, Asim; Dunbar, Robin I.M.; Kaski, Kimmo.

In: Scientific Reports, Vol. 7, No. 1, 10717, 01.12.2017, p. 1-10.

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@article{ea134edb6ce74fe6b8260c9cae28d9b8,
title = "Seasonal and geographical impact on human resting periods",
abstract = "We study the influence of seasonally and geographically related daily dynamics of daylight and ambient temperature on human resting or sleeping patterns using mobile phone data of a large number of individuals. We observe two daily inactivity periods in the people's aggregated mobile phone calling patterns and infer these to represent the resting times of the population. We find that the nocturnal resting period is strongly influenced by the length of daylight, and that its seasonal variation depends on the latitude, such that for people living in two different cities separated by eight latitudinal degrees, the difference in the resting periods of people between the summer and winter in southern cities is almost twice that in the northern cities. We also observe that the duration of the afternoon resting period is influenced by the temperature, and that there is a threshold from which this influence sets in. Finally, we observe that the yearly dynamics of the afternoon and nocturnal resting periods appear to be counterbalancing each other. This also lends support to the notion that the total daily resting time of people is more or less conserved across the year.",
author = "Daniel Monsivais-Velazquez and Kunal Bhattacharya and Asim Ghosh and Dunbar, {Robin I.M.} and Kimmo Kaski",
note = "| openaire: EC/H2020/662725/EU//IBSEN",
year = "2017",
month = "12",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1038/s41598-017-11125-z",
language = "English",
volume = "7",
pages = "1--10",
journal = "Scientific Reports",
issn = "2045-2322",
publisher = "Nature Publishing Group",
number = "1",

}

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Seasonal and geographical impact on human resting periods

AU - Monsivais-Velazquez, Daniel

AU - Bhattacharya, Kunal

AU - Ghosh, Asim

AU - Dunbar, Robin I.M.

AU - Kaski, Kimmo

N1 - | openaire: EC/H2020/662725/EU//IBSEN

PY - 2017/12/1

Y1 - 2017/12/1

N2 - We study the influence of seasonally and geographically related daily dynamics of daylight and ambient temperature on human resting or sleeping patterns using mobile phone data of a large number of individuals. We observe two daily inactivity periods in the people's aggregated mobile phone calling patterns and infer these to represent the resting times of the population. We find that the nocturnal resting period is strongly influenced by the length of daylight, and that its seasonal variation depends on the latitude, such that for people living in two different cities separated by eight latitudinal degrees, the difference in the resting periods of people between the summer and winter in southern cities is almost twice that in the northern cities. We also observe that the duration of the afternoon resting period is influenced by the temperature, and that there is a threshold from which this influence sets in. Finally, we observe that the yearly dynamics of the afternoon and nocturnal resting periods appear to be counterbalancing each other. This also lends support to the notion that the total daily resting time of people is more or less conserved across the year.

AB - We study the influence of seasonally and geographically related daily dynamics of daylight and ambient temperature on human resting or sleeping patterns using mobile phone data of a large number of individuals. We observe two daily inactivity periods in the people's aggregated mobile phone calling patterns and infer these to represent the resting times of the population. We find that the nocturnal resting period is strongly influenced by the length of daylight, and that its seasonal variation depends on the latitude, such that for people living in two different cities separated by eight latitudinal degrees, the difference in the resting periods of people between the summer and winter in southern cities is almost twice that in the northern cities. We also observe that the duration of the afternoon resting period is influenced by the temperature, and that there is a threshold from which this influence sets in. Finally, we observe that the yearly dynamics of the afternoon and nocturnal resting periods appear to be counterbalancing each other. This also lends support to the notion that the total daily resting time of people is more or less conserved across the year.

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85028915844&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1038/s41598-017-11125-z

DO - 10.1038/s41598-017-11125-z

M3 - Article

VL - 7

SP - 1

EP - 10

JO - Scientific Reports

JF - Scientific Reports

SN - 2045-2322

IS - 1

M1 - 10717

ER -

ID: 15292966