Remarkable Reproducibility of Enzyme Activity Profiles in Tomato Fruits Grown under Contrasting Environments Provides a Roadmap for Studies of Fruit Metabolism

Benoit Biais, Camille Benard, Bertrand Beauvoit, Sophie Colombie, Duyen Prodhomme, Guillaume Menard, Stephane Bernillon, Bernadette Gehl, Helene Gautier, Patricia Ballias, Jean-Pierre Mazat, Lee Sweetlove, Michel Genard, Yves Gibon*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

To assess the influence of the environment on fruit metabolism, tomato (Solanum lycopersicum 'Moneymaker') plants were grown under contrasting conditions (optimal for commercial, water limited, or shaded production) and locations. Samples were harvested at nine stages of development, and 36 enzyme activities of central metabolism were measured as well as protein, starch, and major metabolites, such as hexoses, sucrose, organic acids, and amino acids. The most remarkable result was the high reproducibility of enzyme activities throughout development, irrespective of conditions or location. Hierarchical clustering of enzyme activities also revealed tight relationships between metabolic pathways and phases of development. Thus, cell division was characterized by high activities of fructokinase, glucokinase, pyruvate kinase, and tricarboxylic acid cycle enzymes, indicating ATP production as a priority, whereas cell expansion was characterized by enzymes involved in the lower part of glycolysis, suggesting a metabolic reprogramming to anaplerosis. As expected, enzymes involved in the accumulation of sugars, citrate, and glutamate were strongly increased during ripening. However, a group of enzymes involved in ATP production, which is probably fueled by starch degradation, was also increased. Metabolites levels seemed more sensitive than enzymes to the environment, although such differences tended to decrease at ripening. The integration of enzyme and metabolite data obtained under contrasting growth conditions using principal component analysis suggests that, with the exceptions of alanine amino transferase and glutamate and malate dehydrogenase and malate, there are no links between single enzyme activities and metabolite time courses or levels.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1204-1221
Number of pages18
JournalPLANT PHYSIOLOGY
Volume164
Issue number3
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2014
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Keywords

  • POSTTRANSLATIONAL REDOX-MODIFICATION
  • ADP-GLUCOSE PYROPHOSPHORYLASE
  • INTROGRESSION LINE POPULATION
  • NADP-MALIC ENZYME
  • SUCROSE SYNTHASE
  • STARCH ACCUMULATION
  • PHOSPHOENOLPYRUVATE CARBOXYLASE
  • GLUTAMATE-DEHYDROGENASE
  • INORGANIC PYROPHOSPHATE
  • BIOCHEMICAL-ANALYSIS

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