Quantifying ADHD Symptoms in Open-Ended Everyday Life Contexts With a New Virtual Reality Task

Erik Seesjarvi, Jasmin Puhakka, Eeva T. Aronen, Jari Lipsanen, Minna Mannerkoski, Alexandra Hering, Sascha Zuber, Matthias Kliegel, Matti Laine, Juha Salmi*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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Abstract

Objective: To quantify goal-directed behavior and ADHD symptoms in naturalistic conditions, we developed a virtual reality task, EPELI (Executive Performance in Everyday LIving), and tested its predictive, discriminant and concurrent validity. Method: We collected EPELI data, conventional neuropsychological task data, and parent-ratings of executive problems and symptoms in 38 ADHD children and 38 typically developing controls. Results: EPELI showed predictive validity as the ADHD group exhibited higher percentage of irrelevant actions reflecting lower attentional-executive efficacy and more controller movements and total game actions, both indicative of hyperactivity-impulsivity. Further, the five combined EPELI measures showed excellent discriminant validity (area under curve 88 %), while the correlations of the EPELI efficacy measure with parent-rated executive problems (r = .57) and ADHD symptoms (r = .55) pointed to its concurrent validity. Conclusion: We provide a proof-of-concept validation for a new virtual reality tool for ecologically valid assessment of ADHD symptoms.

Original languageEnglish
Number of pages18
JournalJournal of Attention Disorders
DOIs
Publication statusE-pub ahead of print - 5 Dec 2021
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Keywords

  • ADHD
  • executive function
  • naturalistic behavior
  • real-world attention
  • virtual reality
  • ATTENTION-DEFICIT/HYPERACTIVITY DISORDER
  • CONTINUOUS PERFORMANCE-TEST
  • PROSPECTIVE MEMORY
  • OBJECTIVE MEASURES
  • CHILDREN
  • HYPERACTIVITY
  • VALIDATION
  • VALIDITY
  • DEFICITS
  • RATINGS

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