Proton/hydrogen aurora at early and current Mars

Research output: Contribution to conferencePosterScientific

Researchers

  • K. Lovato
  • G. Gronoff
  • S. Curry
  • C. Simon Wedlund
  • Markku Alho

  • W. Moore

Research units

  • Hampton University
  • NASA Langley Research Center
  • University of California at Berkeley
  • University of Oslo

Abstract

In the early Solar System, ( 4 Gyr ago) our Sun was 70% as luminous as today but much more active. Observations of young solar-type stars reveal much more frequent solar flares and therefore coronal mass ejections and energetic particle events. With an increase in energetic particle events, the average flux of protons at the top of planetary atmospheres becomes extremely high, relative to today, as does the peak proton flux experienced by planetary atmospheres during extreme events. Proton/hydrogen precipitation on planets has an impact on the energy balance of their upper atmospheres, can affect the photochemistry, and produces auroral emissions. For example, understanding the proton/hydrogen precipitation at Mars during its early history can help in understanding Martian chemical evolution and atmospheric escape. We have concentrated our efforts on protons up to about 1 MeV energy since these have the most important influence on the upper atmosphere. Using the results from a hybrid plasma model, where ions are treated as particles and electrons as a charge-neutralizing massless fluid, we estimate the proton flux for early Mars up to 1 MeV. Aeroplanets, a kinetic 1D code was used to compute the effects of low-energy proton precipitation (

Details

Original languageEnglish
Publication statusPublished - Dec 2018
MoE publication typeNot Eligible
EventAGU Fall Meeting - Walter E Washington Convention Center, Washington, United States
Duration: 10 Dec 201814 Dec 2018
https://fallmeeting.agu.org/2018/

Conference

ConferenceAGU Fall Meeting
CountryUnited States
CityWashington
Period10/12/201814/12/2018
Internet address

    Research areas

  • 6009 Aurorae, airglow, and X-ray emission, PLANETARY SCIENCES: COMETS AND SMALL BODIESDE: 5706 Aurorae, PLANETARY SCIENCES: FLUID PLANETSDE: 6207 Comparative planetology, PLANETARY SCIENCES: SOLAR SYSTEM OBJECTSDE: 5408 Aurorae and airglow, PLANETARY SCIENCES: SOLID SURFACE PLANETS

ID: 32257684