Processing and Interconnections of Finely Segmented Semiconductor Pixel Detectors for Applications in Particle Physics and Photon Detection

J. Härkönen*, Jennifer Ott, A. Gädda, M. Bezak, E. Brücken, E. Tuovinen, S. Bharthuar, P. Luukka, E. Tuominen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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Abstract

Radiation hardness is in the focus of the development of particle tracking and photon imaging detector installations. Semiconductor detectors, widely used in particle physics experiments, have turned into capacitive-coupled (AC-coupled) detectors from the originally developed conductively coupled (DC-coupled) detectors. This is due to the superior isolation of radiation-induced leakage current in AC-coupled detectors. However, some modern detector systems, such as the tracking detectors in the CERN LHC CMS or ATLAS experiments, are still DC-coupled. This originates from the difficulty of implementing AC coupling on very small pixel detector areas. In this report, we describe our advances in the detector processing technology. The first topic is the applications of the atomic layer deposition processing technology, which enables the very high densities of capacitance and resistance that are needed when the dimensions of the physical segmentation of pixel detectors need to be scaled down. The second topic is the flip-chip/bump-bonding interconnection technology, which is necessary in order to manufacture pixel detector modules on a large scale with a more than 99% yield of noise-free and faultless pixels and detector channels.

Original languageEnglish
Article number601730
Number of pages9
JournalFrontiers in Physics
Volume9
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 19 Feb 2021
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Keywords

  • atomic layer deposition
  • capacitive coupling
  • carrier lifetime
  • magnetic Czochralski silicon
  • pixel detector

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