Probability of Abnormal Indoor Air Exposure Categories Compared with Occupants’ Symptoms, Health Information, and Psychosocial Work Environment

Katja Tähtinen, Sanna Lappalainen, Kirsi Karvala, Marjaana Lahtinen, Heidi Salonen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

11 Citations (Scopus)
114 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Indoor air problems are complicated and need to be approached from many perspectives. In this research, we studied the association of four-level categorisation of the probability of abnormal indoor air (IA) exposure with the work environment-related symptoms, group-level health information and psychosocial work environment of employees. We also evaluated the multiprofessional IA group assessment of the current indoor air quality (IAQ) of the hospital premises. We found no statistical association between the four-level categorisation of the probability of abnormal IA exposure and the employees’ perceived symptoms, health information, and perceived psychosocial work environment. However, the results showed a statistical association between perceived symptoms and man-made vitreous fibre sources in ventilation. Furthermore, extensive impurity sources in the premises increased the employees’ contact with health services and their perceived symptoms. The employees perceived stress and symptoms in all categories of abnormal IA exposure, which may be related to IAQ or other factors affecting human experience. Prolonged process management may influence users’ experiences of IAQ. The results suggest that an extensive impurity source in premises does not always associate with the prevalence of perceived symptoms. We conclude that indoor air questionnaires alone cannot determine the urgency of the measures required.
Original languageEnglish
Article number99
Number of pages15
JournalApplied Sciences (Switzerland)
Volume9
Issue number1
Early online date28 Dec 2018
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2019
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Keywords

  • perceived indoor air quality
  • building research
  • indoor air questionnaires
  • psychosocial work environment
  • categorisation
  • ventilation
  • mould
  • moisture
  • perceived indoor air quality; building researman-made mineral fibres

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