Online social media fatigue and psychological wellbeing—A study of compulsive use, fear of missing out, fatigue, anxiety and depression

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Online social media fatigue and psychological wellbeing—A study of compulsive use, fear of missing out, fatigue, anxiety and depression. / Dhir, Amandeep; Yossatorn, Yossiri; Kaur, Puneet; Chen, Sufen.

In: International Journal of Information Management, Vol. 40, 01.06.2018, p. 141-152.

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@article{eff6b9c5013d4c999cdbebad21915512,
title = "Online social media fatigue and psychological wellbeing—A study of compulsive use, fear of missing out, fatigue, anxiety and depression",
abstract = "The constant development of online social media features and related services has constantly attracted and increased the number of social media users. But, at the same time, a myriad of users have deviated themselves, temporarily or permanently, from social media use due to social media fatigue. Scholars have investigated different antecedents and consequences of social media fatigue. However, empirical relationships between psychosocial wellbeing and social media fatigue are currently not known. To bridge this gap, the current study utilises the stressor-strain-outcome framework (SSO) to examine whether psychosocial wellbeing measures, such as compulsive media use and fear of missing out, trigger fatigue and, furthermore, whether social media fatigue results in anxiety and depression. The study utilised repeated cross-sectional methodology whereby two waves of data (N = 1554, 1144) were collected to test the research model with adolescent social media users in India. The study findings suggest that compulsive media use significantly triggered social media fatigue, which later result in elevated anxiety and depression. Fear of missing out indirectly predicted social media fatigue through mediation of compulsive social media use. The theoretical and practical implications, limitations of the present study and agenda for future studies are presented and discussed.",
keywords = "Adolescents, Anxiety, Compulsive media use, Depression, Fear of missing out, Repeated cross-sectional survey, Social media fatigue",
author = "Amandeep Dhir and Yossiri Yossatorn and Puneet Kaur and Sufen Chen",
year = "2018",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.ijinfomgt.2018.01.012",
language = "English",
volume = "40",
pages = "141--152",
journal = "International Journal of Information Management",
issn = "0268-4012",
publisher = "Elsevier Limited",

}

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Online social media fatigue and psychological wellbeing—A study of compulsive use, fear of missing out, fatigue, anxiety and depression

AU - Dhir, Amandeep

AU - Yossatorn, Yossiri

AU - Kaur, Puneet

AU - Chen, Sufen

PY - 2018/6/1

Y1 - 2018/6/1

N2 - The constant development of online social media features and related services has constantly attracted and increased the number of social media users. But, at the same time, a myriad of users have deviated themselves, temporarily or permanently, from social media use due to social media fatigue. Scholars have investigated different antecedents and consequences of social media fatigue. However, empirical relationships between psychosocial wellbeing and social media fatigue are currently not known. To bridge this gap, the current study utilises the stressor-strain-outcome framework (SSO) to examine whether psychosocial wellbeing measures, such as compulsive media use and fear of missing out, trigger fatigue and, furthermore, whether social media fatigue results in anxiety and depression. The study utilised repeated cross-sectional methodology whereby two waves of data (N = 1554, 1144) were collected to test the research model with adolescent social media users in India. The study findings suggest that compulsive media use significantly triggered social media fatigue, which later result in elevated anxiety and depression. Fear of missing out indirectly predicted social media fatigue through mediation of compulsive social media use. The theoretical and practical implications, limitations of the present study and agenda for future studies are presented and discussed.

AB - The constant development of online social media features and related services has constantly attracted and increased the number of social media users. But, at the same time, a myriad of users have deviated themselves, temporarily or permanently, from social media use due to social media fatigue. Scholars have investigated different antecedents and consequences of social media fatigue. However, empirical relationships between psychosocial wellbeing and social media fatigue are currently not known. To bridge this gap, the current study utilises the stressor-strain-outcome framework (SSO) to examine whether psychosocial wellbeing measures, such as compulsive media use and fear of missing out, trigger fatigue and, furthermore, whether social media fatigue results in anxiety and depression. The study utilised repeated cross-sectional methodology whereby two waves of data (N = 1554, 1144) were collected to test the research model with adolescent social media users in India. The study findings suggest that compulsive media use significantly triggered social media fatigue, which later result in elevated anxiety and depression. Fear of missing out indirectly predicted social media fatigue through mediation of compulsive social media use. The theoretical and practical implications, limitations of the present study and agenda for future studies are presented and discussed.

KW - Adolescents

KW - Anxiety

KW - Compulsive media use

KW - Depression

KW - Fear of missing out

KW - Repeated cross-sectional survey

KW - Social media fatigue

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85042357811&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.ijinfomgt.2018.01.012

DO - 10.1016/j.ijinfomgt.2018.01.012

M3 - Article

VL - 40

SP - 141

EP - 152

JO - International Journal of Information Management

JF - International Journal of Information Management

SN - 0268-4012

ER -

ID: 18143981