On the Internet, Nobody Knows You’re a Dog... Unless You’re Another Dog

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientificpeer-review

8 Citations (Scopus)
174 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

How humans use computers has evolved from human– machine interfaces to human–human computer mediated communication. Whilst the field of animal–computer interaction has roots in HCI, technology developed in this area currently only supports animal– computer communication. This design fiction paper presents animal– animal connected interfaces, using dogs as an instance. Through a co-design workshop, we created six proposals. The designs focused on what a dog internet could look like and how interactions might be presented. Analysis of the narratives and conceived designs indicated that participants’ concerns focused around asymmetries within the interaction. This resulted in the use of objects seen as familiar to dogs. This was conjoined with interest in how to initiate and end interactions, which was often achieved through notification systems. This paper builds upon HCI methods for unconventional users, and applies a design fiction approach to uncover key questions towards the creation of animal-to-animal interfaces.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 2019 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
PublisherACM
ISBN (Electronic)9781450359702
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 3 May 2019
MoE publication typeA4 Article in a conference publication
EventACM SIGCHI Annual Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Glasgow, United Kingdom
Duration: 4 May 20199 May 2019
https://chi2019.acm.org/

Conference

ConferenceACM SIGCHI Annual Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Abbreviated titleACM CHI
CountryUnited Kingdom
CityGlasgow
Period04/05/201909/05/2019
Internet address

Keywords

  • Animal–Computer Interaction
  • Animal Internet
  • Design Fiction
  • Dog–Computer Interaction

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