Noise and counting statistics of a single electron emitter: Theory

Mathias Albert*, Christian Flindt, Markus Büttiker

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientificpeer-review

Abstract

We review the latest progress in understanding the fundamental noise properties of a coherent single electron emitter known as the mesoscopic capacitor. The system consists of a submicron cavity connected to a two-dimensional electron gas via a quantum point contact. When subject to periodic gate voltage modulations, the mesoscopic capacitor absorbs and re-emits single electrons at giga-hertz frequencies as it has been demonstrated experimentally. Recent high-frequency noise measurements have moreover allowed for a precise characterization of the device in different operating regimes. Here we discuss a simple model of the basic charge transfer processes in the mesoscopic capacitor and show how the model is capable of fully reproducing the measured high-frequency noise spectrum. We extend our analysis to the counting statistics of emitted electrons during a large number of periods which we use to discuss the accuracy of the mesoscopic capacitor as a single electron source. Finally, we consider possible applications of the mesoscopic capacitor in future experiments and identify novel pathways for further theoretical research.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publication2011 21st INTERNATIONAL CONFERENCE ON NOISE AND FLUCTUATIONS (ICNF)
EditorsMJ Deen, CH Chen
PublisherIEEE
Pages162-167
Number of pages6
ISBN (Print)978-1-4577-0192-4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2011
MoE publication typeA4 Article in a conference publication
EventInternational Conference on Noise and Fluctuations - Toronto, Canada
Duration: 12 Jun 201116 Jun 2011
Conference number: 21

Conference

ConferenceInternational Conference on Noise and Fluctuations
Abbreviated titleICNF
CountryCanada
CityToronto
Period12/06/201116/06/2011

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