Mechanical properties and applications of recycled polycarbonate particle material extrusion-based additive manufacturing

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Mechanical properties and applications of recycled polycarbonate particle material extrusion-based additive manufacturing. / Reich, Matthew J.; Woern, Aubrey L.; Tanikella, Nagendra G.; Pearce, Joshua M.

In: Materials, Vol. 12, No. 10, 1642, 01.05.2019.

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@article{3dc23c7d6ebe403cbbee0e23cb515e94,
title = "Mechanical properties and applications of recycled polycarbonate particle material extrusion-based additive manufacturing",
abstract = "Past work has shown that particle material extrusion (fused particle fabrication (FPF)/fused granular fabrication (FGF)) has the potential for increasing the use of recycled polymers in 3D printing. This study extends this potential to high-performance (high-mechanical-strength and heat-resistant) polymers using polycarbonate (PC). Recycled PC regrind of approximately 25 mm2 was 3D printed with an open-source Gigabot X and analyzed. A temperature and nozzle velocity matrix was used to find useful printing parameters, and a print test was used to maximize the output for a two-temperature stage extruder for PC. ASTM type 4 tensile test geometries as well as ASTM-approved compression tests were used to determine the mechanical properties of PC and were compared with filament printing and the bulk virgin material. The results showed the tensile strength of parts manufactured from the recycled PC particles (64.9 MPa) were comparable to that of the commercial filament printed on desktop (62.2 MPa) and large-format (66.3 MPa) 3D printers. Three case study applications were investigated: (i) using PC as a rapid molding technology for lower melting point thermoplastics, (ii) printed parts for high temperature applications, and (iii) printed parts for high-strength applications. The results show that recycled PC particle-based 3D printing can produce high-strength and heat-resistant products at low costs.",
keywords = "3D printing, Additive manufacturing, Circular economy, Distributed manufacturing, Extruder, Polycarbonate, Polymers, Recycling, Upcycle, Waste plastic",
author = "Reich, {Matthew J.} and Woern, {Aubrey L.} and Tanikella, {Nagendra G.} and Pearce, {Joshua M.}",
year = "2019",
month = "5",
day = "1",
doi = "10.3390/ma12101642",
language = "English",
volume = "12",
journal = "Materials",
issn = "1996-1944",
publisher = "MDPI AG",
number = "10",

}

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Mechanical properties and applications of recycled polycarbonate particle material extrusion-based additive manufacturing

AU - Reich, Matthew J.

AU - Woern, Aubrey L.

AU - Tanikella, Nagendra G.

AU - Pearce, Joshua M.

PY - 2019/5/1

Y1 - 2019/5/1

N2 - Past work has shown that particle material extrusion (fused particle fabrication (FPF)/fused granular fabrication (FGF)) has the potential for increasing the use of recycled polymers in 3D printing. This study extends this potential to high-performance (high-mechanical-strength and heat-resistant) polymers using polycarbonate (PC). Recycled PC regrind of approximately 25 mm2 was 3D printed with an open-source Gigabot X and analyzed. A temperature and nozzle velocity matrix was used to find useful printing parameters, and a print test was used to maximize the output for a two-temperature stage extruder for PC. ASTM type 4 tensile test geometries as well as ASTM-approved compression tests were used to determine the mechanical properties of PC and were compared with filament printing and the bulk virgin material. The results showed the tensile strength of parts manufactured from the recycled PC particles (64.9 MPa) were comparable to that of the commercial filament printed on desktop (62.2 MPa) and large-format (66.3 MPa) 3D printers. Three case study applications were investigated: (i) using PC as a rapid molding technology for lower melting point thermoplastics, (ii) printed parts for high temperature applications, and (iii) printed parts for high-strength applications. The results show that recycled PC particle-based 3D printing can produce high-strength and heat-resistant products at low costs.

AB - Past work has shown that particle material extrusion (fused particle fabrication (FPF)/fused granular fabrication (FGF)) has the potential for increasing the use of recycled polymers in 3D printing. This study extends this potential to high-performance (high-mechanical-strength and heat-resistant) polymers using polycarbonate (PC). Recycled PC regrind of approximately 25 mm2 was 3D printed with an open-source Gigabot X and analyzed. A temperature and nozzle velocity matrix was used to find useful printing parameters, and a print test was used to maximize the output for a two-temperature stage extruder for PC. ASTM type 4 tensile test geometries as well as ASTM-approved compression tests were used to determine the mechanical properties of PC and were compared with filament printing and the bulk virgin material. The results showed the tensile strength of parts manufactured from the recycled PC particles (64.9 MPa) were comparable to that of the commercial filament printed on desktop (62.2 MPa) and large-format (66.3 MPa) 3D printers. Three case study applications were investigated: (i) using PC as a rapid molding technology for lower melting point thermoplastics, (ii) printed parts for high temperature applications, and (iii) printed parts for high-strength applications. The results show that recycled PC particle-based 3D printing can produce high-strength and heat-resistant products at low costs.

KW - 3D printing

KW - Additive manufacturing

KW - Circular economy

KW - Distributed manufacturing

KW - Extruder

KW - Polycarbonate

KW - Polymers

KW - Recycling

KW - Upcycle

KW - Waste plastic

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85066830279&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3390/ma12101642

DO - 10.3390/ma12101642

M3 - Article

VL - 12

JO - Materials

JF - Materials

SN - 1996-1944

IS - 10

M1 - 1642

ER -

ID: 34936866