Improved Reverberation Time Control for Feedback Delay Networks

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientificpeer-review

Standard

Improved Reverberation Time Control for Feedback Delay Networks. / Prawda, Karolina; Välimäki, Vesa; Schlecht, Sebastian.

Proceedings of the International Conference on Digital Audio Effects. University of Birmingham, 2019. (Proceedings of the International Conference on Digital Audio Effects).

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientificpeer-review

Harvard

Prawda, K, Välimäki, V & Schlecht, S 2019, Improved Reverberation Time Control for Feedback Delay Networks. in Proceedings of the International Conference on Digital Audio Effects. Proceedings of the International Conference on Digital Audio Effects, University of Birmingham, International Conference on Digital Audio Effects, Birmingham, United Kingdom, 02/09/2019.

APA

Prawda, K., Välimäki, V., & Schlecht, S. (2019). Improved Reverberation Time Control for Feedback Delay Networks. In Proceedings of the International Conference on Digital Audio Effects (Proceedings of the International Conference on Digital Audio Effects). University of Birmingham.

Vancouver

Prawda K, Välimäki V, Schlecht S. Improved Reverberation Time Control for Feedback Delay Networks. In Proceedings of the International Conference on Digital Audio Effects. University of Birmingham. 2019. (Proceedings of the International Conference on Digital Audio Effects).

Author

Prawda, Karolina ; Välimäki, Vesa ; Schlecht, Sebastian. / Improved Reverberation Time Control for Feedback Delay Networks. Proceedings of the International Conference on Digital Audio Effects. University of Birmingham, 2019. (Proceedings of the International Conference on Digital Audio Effects).

Bibtex - Download

@inproceedings{1c6480890e2f4952b1b9b9083ec1fb16,
title = "Improved Reverberation Time Control for Feedback Delay Networks",
abstract = "Artificial reverberation algorithms generally imitate the frequency-dependent decay of sound in a room quite inaccurately. Previous research suggests that a 5{\%} error in the reverberation time (T60) can be audible. In this work, we propose to use an accurate graphic equalizer as the attenuation filter in a Feedback Delay Network reverberator. We use a modified octave graphic equalizer with a cascade structure and insert a high-shelf filter to control the gain at the high end of the audio range. One such equalizer is placed at the end of each delay line of the Feedback Delay Network. The gains of the equalizer are optimized using a new weighting function that acknowledges nonlinear error propagation from filter magnitude response to reverberation time values. Our experiments show that in real-world cases, the target T60 curve can be reproduced in a perceptually accurate manner at standard octave center frequencies. However, for an extreme test case in which the T60 varies dramatically between neighboring octave bands, the error still exceeds the limit of the just noticeable difference but is smaller than that obtained with previous methods. This work leads to more realistic artificial reverberation.",
author = "Karolina Prawda and Vesa V{\"a}lim{\"a}ki and Sebastian Schlecht",
year = "2019",
month = "9",
day = "2",
language = "English",
series = "Proceedings of the International Conference on Digital Audio Effects",
publisher = "University of Birmingham",
booktitle = "Proceedings of the International Conference on Digital Audio Effects",

}

RIS - Download

TY - GEN

T1 - Improved Reverberation Time Control for Feedback Delay Networks

AU - Prawda, Karolina

AU - Välimäki, Vesa

AU - Schlecht, Sebastian

PY - 2019/9/2

Y1 - 2019/9/2

N2 - Artificial reverberation algorithms generally imitate the frequency-dependent decay of sound in a room quite inaccurately. Previous research suggests that a 5% error in the reverberation time (T60) can be audible. In this work, we propose to use an accurate graphic equalizer as the attenuation filter in a Feedback Delay Network reverberator. We use a modified octave graphic equalizer with a cascade structure and insert a high-shelf filter to control the gain at the high end of the audio range. One such equalizer is placed at the end of each delay line of the Feedback Delay Network. The gains of the equalizer are optimized using a new weighting function that acknowledges nonlinear error propagation from filter magnitude response to reverberation time values. Our experiments show that in real-world cases, the target T60 curve can be reproduced in a perceptually accurate manner at standard octave center frequencies. However, for an extreme test case in which the T60 varies dramatically between neighboring octave bands, the error still exceeds the limit of the just noticeable difference but is smaller than that obtained with previous methods. This work leads to more realistic artificial reverberation.

AB - Artificial reverberation algorithms generally imitate the frequency-dependent decay of sound in a room quite inaccurately. Previous research suggests that a 5% error in the reverberation time (T60) can be audible. In this work, we propose to use an accurate graphic equalizer as the attenuation filter in a Feedback Delay Network reverberator. We use a modified octave graphic equalizer with a cascade structure and insert a high-shelf filter to control the gain at the high end of the audio range. One such equalizer is placed at the end of each delay line of the Feedback Delay Network. The gains of the equalizer are optimized using a new weighting function that acknowledges nonlinear error propagation from filter magnitude response to reverberation time values. Our experiments show that in real-world cases, the target T60 curve can be reproduced in a perceptually accurate manner at standard octave center frequencies. However, for an extreme test case in which the T60 varies dramatically between neighboring octave bands, the error still exceeds the limit of the just noticeable difference but is smaller than that obtained with previous methods. This work leads to more realistic artificial reverberation.

M3 - Conference contribution

T3 - Proceedings of the International Conference on Digital Audio Effects

BT - Proceedings of the International Conference on Digital Audio Effects

PB - University of Birmingham

ER -

ID: 36767692