Improved accuracy of thermal desorption spectroscopy by specimen cooling during measurement of hydrogen concentration in a high-strength steel

Eric Fangnon*, Evgenii Malitckii, Yuriy Yagodzinskyy, Pedro Vilaça

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

1 Citation (Scopus)
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Abstract

Thermal desorption spectroscopy (TDS) is a powerful method for the measurement of hydrogen concentration in metallic materials. However, hydrogen loss from metallic samples during the preparation of the measurement poses a challenge to the accuracy of the results, especially in materials with high diffusivity of hydrogen, like ferritic and ferritic-martensitic steels. In the present paper, the effect of specimen cooling during the experimental procedure, as a tentative to reduce the loss of hydrogen during air-lock vacuum pumping for one high-strength steel of 1400 MPa, is evaluated. The results show, at room temperature, the presence of a continuous outward hydrogen flux accompanied with the redistribution of hydrogen within the measured steel during its exposure to the air-lock vacuum chamber under continuous pumping. Cooling of the steel samples to 213 K during pumping in the air-lock vacuum chamber before TDS measurement results in an increase in the measured total hydrogen concentration at about 14%. A significant reduction in hydrogen loss and redistribution within the steel sample improves the accuracy of hydrogen concentration measurement and trapping analysis in ferritic and martensitic steels.

Original languageEnglish
Article number1252
Number of pages10
JournalMaterials
Volume13
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 10 Mar 2020
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Keywords

  • High-strength steel
  • Hydrogen
  • Hydrogen concentration
  • Hydrogen loss
  • Sample cooling
  • Thermal desorption spectroscopy

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