I don't mind being logged, but want to remain in control: A field study of mobile activity and context logging

Tuula Kärkkäinen*, Tuomas Vaittinen, Kaisa Väänänen-Vainio-Mattila

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientificpeer-review

19 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

People have a natural tendency to capture and share their experiences via stories, photos and other mementos. As users are increasingly carrying the enabling devices with them, capturing life events is becoming more spontaneous. The automatic and persistent collecting of information about one's life and behavior is called lifelogging. Lifelogging relieves the user from manually capturing events but also poses many challenges from the user's perspective. We conducted a field study to explore the user experience of mobile phone activity and context logging, a technically feasible form of lifelogging. Our results indicate that users quickly stop to pay attention to the logging, but they want to be in control of logging the most private information. Although logging personal content, such as text messages, is experienced as a possible privacy threat, browsing the content and getting insight to the revealed life patterns was considered interesting and fun.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationCHI 2010 - ACM Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Pages163-172
Number of pages10
Volume1
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2010
MoE publication typeA4 Article in a conference publication
EventACM SIGCHI Annual Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Atlanta, United States
Duration: 10 Apr 201015 Apr 2010
Conference number: 28

Conference

ConferenceACM SIGCHI Annual Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Abbreviated titleACM CHI
CountryUnited States
CityAtlanta
Period10/04/201015/04/2010

Keywords

  • context
  • field study
  • lifelogging
  • mobile phone activity
  • user experience

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