Hydrology of Drained Peatland Forest: Numerical Experiment on the Role of Tree Stand Heterogeneity and Management

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Hydrology of Drained Peatland Forest: Numerical Experiment on the Role of Tree Stand Heterogeneity and Management. / Stenberg, Leena; Haahti, Kersti; Hökkä, Hannu; Launiainen, Samuli; Nieminen, Mika; Laurén, Ari; Koivusalo, Harri.

In: Forests, Vol. 9, No. 10, 645, 16.10.2018.

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Stenberg L, Haahti K, Hökkä H, Launiainen S, Nieminen M, Laurén A et al. Hydrology of Drained Peatland Forest: Numerical Experiment on the Role of Tree Stand Heterogeneity and Management. Forests. 2018 Oct 16;9(10). 645. https://doi.org/10.3390/f9100645

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Stenberg, Leena ; Haahti, Kersti ; Hökkä, Hannu ; Launiainen, Samuli ; Nieminen, Mika ; Laurén, Ari ; Koivusalo, Harri. / Hydrology of Drained Peatland Forest: Numerical Experiment on the Role of Tree Stand Heterogeneity and Management. In: Forests. 2018 ; Vol. 9, No. 10.

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@article{87d5c112887b44de8a4a4513de1bd2f4,
title = "Hydrology of Drained Peatland Forest: Numerical Experiment on the Role of Tree Stand Heterogeneity and Management",
abstract = "A prerequisite for sustainable peatland forestry is sufficiently low water table (WT) level for profitable tree production. This requires better understanding on controls and feedbacks between tree stand and its evapotranspiration, drainage network condition, climate, and WT levels. This study explores the role of spatial tree stand distribution in the spatiotemporal distribution of WT levels and site water balance. A numerical experiment was conducted by a three-dimensional (3-D) hydrological model (FLUSH) applied to a 0.5 ha peatland forest assuming (1) spatially uniform interception and transpiration, (2) interception and transpiration scaled with spatial distributions of tree crown and root biomass, and (3) the combination of spatially scaled interception and uniform transpiration. Site water balance and WT levels were simulated for two meteorologically contrasting years. Spatial variations in transpiration were found to control WT levels even in a forest with relatively low stand stem volume (<100 m3/ha). Forest management scenarios demonstrated how stand thinning and reduced drainage efficiency raised WT levels and increased the area and duration of excessively wet conditions having potentially negative economic (reduced tree growth) and environmental (e.g., methane emissions, phosphorus mobilization) consequences. In practice, silvicultural treatment manipulating spatial stand structure should be optimized to avoid emergence of wet spots.",
keywords = "distributed hydrological modeling, drained peatland forest, spatial biomass distribution, water balance, water table depth",
author = "Leena Stenberg and Kersti Haahti and Hannu H{\"o}kk{\"a} and Samuli Launiainen and Mika Nieminen and Ari Laur{\'e}n and Harri Koivusalo",
year = "2018",
month = "10",
day = "16",
doi = "10.3390/f9100645",
language = "English",
volume = "9",
journal = "Forests",
issn = "1999-4907",
publisher = "MDPI AG",
number = "10",

}

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Hydrology of Drained Peatland Forest: Numerical Experiment on the Role of Tree Stand Heterogeneity and Management

AU - Stenberg, Leena

AU - Haahti, Kersti

AU - Hökkä, Hannu

AU - Launiainen, Samuli

AU - Nieminen, Mika

AU - Laurén, Ari

AU - Koivusalo, Harri

PY - 2018/10/16

Y1 - 2018/10/16

N2 - A prerequisite for sustainable peatland forestry is sufficiently low water table (WT) level for profitable tree production. This requires better understanding on controls and feedbacks between tree stand and its evapotranspiration, drainage network condition, climate, and WT levels. This study explores the role of spatial tree stand distribution in the spatiotemporal distribution of WT levels and site water balance. A numerical experiment was conducted by a three-dimensional (3-D) hydrological model (FLUSH) applied to a 0.5 ha peatland forest assuming (1) spatially uniform interception and transpiration, (2) interception and transpiration scaled with spatial distributions of tree crown and root biomass, and (3) the combination of spatially scaled interception and uniform transpiration. Site water balance and WT levels were simulated for two meteorologically contrasting years. Spatial variations in transpiration were found to control WT levels even in a forest with relatively low stand stem volume (<100 m3/ha). Forest management scenarios demonstrated how stand thinning and reduced drainage efficiency raised WT levels and increased the area and duration of excessively wet conditions having potentially negative economic (reduced tree growth) and environmental (e.g., methane emissions, phosphorus mobilization) consequences. In practice, silvicultural treatment manipulating spatial stand structure should be optimized to avoid emergence of wet spots.

AB - A prerequisite for sustainable peatland forestry is sufficiently low water table (WT) level for profitable tree production. This requires better understanding on controls and feedbacks between tree stand and its evapotranspiration, drainage network condition, climate, and WT levels. This study explores the role of spatial tree stand distribution in the spatiotemporal distribution of WT levels and site water balance. A numerical experiment was conducted by a three-dimensional (3-D) hydrological model (FLUSH) applied to a 0.5 ha peatland forest assuming (1) spatially uniform interception and transpiration, (2) interception and transpiration scaled with spatial distributions of tree crown and root biomass, and (3) the combination of spatially scaled interception and uniform transpiration. Site water balance and WT levels were simulated for two meteorologically contrasting years. Spatial variations in transpiration were found to control WT levels even in a forest with relatively low stand stem volume (<100 m3/ha). Forest management scenarios demonstrated how stand thinning and reduced drainage efficiency raised WT levels and increased the area and duration of excessively wet conditions having potentially negative economic (reduced tree growth) and environmental (e.g., methane emissions, phosphorus mobilization) consequences. In practice, silvicultural treatment manipulating spatial stand structure should be optimized to avoid emergence of wet spots.

KW - distributed hydrological modeling

KW - drained peatland forest

KW - spatial biomass distribution

KW - water balance

KW - water table depth

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85055173909&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.3390/f9100645

DO - 10.3390/f9100645

M3 - Article

VL - 9

JO - Forests

JF - Forests

SN - 1999-4907

IS - 10

M1 - 645

ER -

ID: 28852097