How We Type: Movement Strategies and Performance in Everyday Typing

Anna Maria Feit, Daryl Weir, Antti Oulasvirta

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientificpeer-review

36 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

This paper revisits the present understanding of typing, which originates mostly from studies of trained typists using the ten-finger touch typing system. Our goal is to characterise the majority of present-day users who are untrained and employ diverse, self-taught techniques. In a transcription task, we compare self-taught typists and those that took a touch typing course. We report several differences in performance, gaze deployment and movement strategies. The most surprising finding is that self-taught typists can achieve performance levels comparable with touch typists, even when using fewer fingers. Motion capture data exposes 3 predictors of high performance: 1) unambiguous mapping (a letter is consistently pressed by the same finger), 2) active preparation of upcoming keystrokes, and 3) minimal global hand motion. We release an extensive dataset on everyday typing behavior.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 2016 CHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Place of PublicationNew York, NY, USA
PublisherACM
Pages4262-4273
Number of pages12
ISBN (Print)978-1-4503-3362-7
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 9 May 2016
MoE publication typeA4 Article in a conference publication
EventACM SIGCHI Annual Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - Colorado Convention Center, Denver, United States
Duration: 6 May 201711 May 2017
Conference number: 35
https://chi2017.acm.org/

Conference

ConferenceACM SIGCHI Annual Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems
Abbreviated titleACM CHI
CountryUnited States
CityDenver
Period06/05/201711/05/2017
Internet address

Keywords

  • motion capture data
  • movement strategies
  • typing performance
  • touch typing
  • text entry

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