Functional Imaging of Audio-Visual Selective Attention in Monkeys and Humans: How do Lapses in Monkey Performance Affect Cross-Species Correspondences?

Teemu Rinne, Ross S. Muers, Emma Salo, Heather Slater, Christopher I. Petkov*

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

10 Citations (Scopus)
93 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

The cross-species correspondences and differences in how attention modulates brain responses in humans and animal models are poorly understood. We trained 2 monkeys to perform an audio-visual selective attention task during functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI), rewarding them to attend to stimuli in one modality while ignoring those in the other. Monkey fMRI identified regions strongly modulated by auditory or visual attention. Surprisingly, auditory attention-related modulations were much more restricted in monkeys than humans performing the same tasks during fMRI. Further analyses ruled out trivial explanations, suggesting that labile selective-attention performance was associated with inhomogeneous modulations in wide cortical regions in the monkeys. The findings provide initial insights into how audio-visual selective attention modulates the primate brain, identify sources for "lost" attention effects in monkeys, and carry implications for modeling the neurobiology of human cognition with nonhuman animals.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)3471-3484
Number of pages14
JournalCerebral Cortex
Volume27
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2017
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Keywords

  • auditory cortex
  • fMRI
  • primates

Fingerprint Dive into the research topics of 'Functional Imaging of Audio-Visual Selective Attention in Monkeys and Humans: How do Lapses in Monkey Performance Affect Cross-Species Correspondences?'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this