Extremely low frequency electromagnetic stimulation alters osteoblast actin filament morphology

A.-M. Bique, T. Keskinen, Mervi Paulasto-Kröckel

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientificpeer-review

Abstract

The effect of 50 Hz 1 mT sinusoidal electromagnetic field stimulation (EMF) on osteoblast-like MC3T3-E1 cell morphology was studied 24h after single exposure and after 3 weeks of daily stimulation. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM) revealed differences in F-actin-based filopodia and lamellipodia extent between stimulated and control cell cultures. As actin-based structures have been implicated in Ca2+ storage and signaling, these findings suggest that low EMF energies may be able to perturb Ca2+ signaling through affecting the morphology of these extensions. Furthermore, 3 week SEM observations confirm prior findings of EMF-enhanced differentiation of osteoblast-like cells as evidenced by improved spreading and mineralization of stimulated cells.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationIFMBE Proceedings
EditorsTomaz Jarm, Peter Kramar
Pages155-158
Number of pages4
Volume53
ISBN (Electronic)9789812878175
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 2016
MoE publication typeA4 Article in a conference publication
EventWorld Congress on Electroporation and Pulsed Electric Fields in Biology, Medicine and Food and Environmental Technologies - Portoroz, Slovenia
Duration: 6 Sep 201510 Sep 2015
Conference number: 1

Publication series

NameIFMBE proceedings
PublisherInternational Federation for Medical Biological Engineering
Volume53
ISSN (Print)1680-0737
ISSN (Electronic)1433-9277

Conference

ConferenceWorld Congress on Electroporation and Pulsed Electric Fields in Biology, Medicine and Food and Environmental Technologies
CountrySlovenia
CityPortoroz
Period06/09/201510/09/2015

Keywords

  • F-actin
  • Microvilli
  • Osteoblast morphology
  • Pulsed electromagnetic fields
  • SEM

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