Electrochemical properties of honeycomb-like structured HFBI self-organized membranes on HOPG electrodes

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Researchers

  • Ryota Yamasaki
  • Yoshiyuki Takatsuji
  • Michael Lienemann
  • Hitoshi Asakawa
  • Takeshi Fukuma
  • Markus Linder

  • Tetsuya Haruyama

Research units

  • VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland
  • Kyushu Institute of Technology
  • Japan Science and Technology Agency
  • Kanazawa University

Abstract

HFBI (derived from Trichoderma sp.) is a unique structural protein, which forms a self-organized monolayer at both air/water interface and water/solid interfaces in accurate two-dimensional ordered structures. We have taken advantage of the unique functionality of HFBI as a molecular carrier for preparation of ordered molecular phase on solid substrate surfaces. The HFBI molecular carrier can easily form ordered structures; however, the dense molecular layers form an electrochemical barrier between the electrode and solution phase. In this study, the electrochemical properties of HFBI self-organized membrane-covered electrodes were investigated. Wild-type HFBI has balanced positive and negative charges on its surface. Highly oriented pyrolytic graphite (HOPG) electrodes coated with HFBI molecules were investigated electrochemically. To improve the electrochemical properties of this HFBI-coated electrode, the two types of HFBI variants, with oppositely charged surfaces, were prepared genetically. All three types of HFBI-coated HOPG electrode perform electron transfer between the electrode and solution phase through the dense HFBI molecular layer. This is because the HFBI self-organized membrane has a honeycomb-like structure, with penetrating holes. In the cases of HFBI variants, the oppositely charged HFBI membrane phases shown opposite electrochemical behaviors in electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. HFBI is a molecule with a unique structure, and can easily form honeycomb-like structures on solid material surfaces such as electrodes. The molecular membrane phase can be used for electrochemical molecular interfaces.

Details

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)803-808
Number of pages6
JournalColloids and Surfaces B: Biointerfaces
Volume123
Publication statusPublished - 1 Nov 2014
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

    Research areas

  • Electrochemical, Engineered protein, HFBI, Impedance, Modified electrode, Self-assembled membrane

ID: 4809883