Effects of 10 Hz rTMS on spontaneous brain oscillations in non-demented Parkinson's patients: Preliminary results of combined MEG-rTMS study

D. Kičić*, R. Bikmullina, P. Lioumis, J. Nurminen, S. Kaakkola, J. P. Mäkelä, E. Pekkonen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Therapeutic effects of repetitive transcranial magnetic stimulation (rTMS) are extensively studied in patients with Parkinson's disease (PD). rTMS to primary motor cortex (M1) induces dopamine release in the putamen: consequently M1 is an interesting target for rTMS in PD. The rTMS over M1 in PD patients reduces the reaction time, improves the Unified Parkinson's Disease Rating Scale (UPDRS) scores and alleviates bradykinesia and hypokinesia. However, the effects of rTMS on spontaneous brain activity are not known. We investigated whether subthreshold rTMS to M1 modulated spontaneous oscillations recorded with magnetoencephalography (MEG). MEG from nine medicated, non-demented PD patients displayed a significant increase in beta oscillations after rTMS in the stimulated hemisphere. Minimum current estimate calculations revealed an increase of beta oscillatory activity after the rTMS treatment over the Rolandic regions. The rTMS in PD patients alters spontaneous brain activity as seen with MEG, probably by modulating cortico-thalamo-basal ganglia networks.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)717-720
Number of pages4
JournalInternational Congress Series
Volume1300
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Jun 2007
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Keywords

  • Magnetoencephalography
  • Parkinson's disease
  • Spontaneous oscillations
  • Transcranial magnetic stimulation

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