Effect of Incidence Angle on the Spatial-Average of Incident Power Density Definition to Correlate Skin Temperature Rise for Millimeter Wave Exposures

Yinliang Diao*, Kun Li, Kensuke Sasaki, Sachiko Kodera, Ilkka Laakso, Walid El Hajj, Akimasa Hirata

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

2 Citations (Scopus)
16 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

This article reports on an intercomparison study on the effect of the incidence angle on the spatial average of incident power density (PD) and resultant temperature rise using computational and thermographic measurement approaches. Two definitions of the spatial average of incident PD - the peak spatial-average normal component of the Poynting vector and peak spatial-average norm of the Poynting vector - were compared. First, an intercomparison of incident PD and temperature rise in a layered skin model was conducted for a 4 × 4 dipole array antenna. The variations caused by antenna type, antenna-body distance, and skin model to these definitions were then discussed. The results revealed that both definitions are in good agreement and correlate with the peak temperature rise for small or moderate incidence angles. The heating factor was enhanced for transverse-magnetic-like polarized waves for peak spatial-average normal component of the Poynting vector for large-angle incidences because of the Brewster effect. The normal incidence scenario was confirmed to be essential for considering the peak skin temperature rise.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)1709-1716
Number of pages8
JournalIEEE Transactions on Electromagnetic Compatibility
Volume63
Issue number5
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Oct 2021
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Keywords

  • Electromagnetic safety
  • incident power density
  • millimeter wave exposure
  • skin model
  • standardization
  • temperature rise

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Effect of Incidence Angle on the Spatial-Average of Incident Power Density Definition to Correlate Skin Temperature Rise for Millimeter Wave Exposures'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this