Dynamic correlations in ongoing neuronal oscillations in humans - perspectives on brain function and its disorders

Simo Monto

    Research output: ThesisDoctoral ThesisCollection of Articles

    Abstract

    This Thesis is involved with neuronal oscillations in the human brain and their coordination across time, space and frequency. The aim of the Thesis was to quantify correlations in neuronal oscillations over these dimensions, and to elucidate their significance in cognitive processing and brain disorders. Magnetoencephalographic (MEG) recordings of major depression patients revealed that long-range temporal correlations (LRTC) were decreased, compared to control subjects, in the 5 Hz oscillations in a manner that was dependent on the degree of the disorder. While studying epileptic patients, on the other hand, it was found that the LRTC in neuronal oscillations recorded intracranially with electroencephalography (EEG) were strengthened in the seizure initiation region. A novel approach to map spatial correlations between cortical regions was developed. The method is based on parcellating the cortex to patches and estimating phase synchrony between all patches. Mapping synchrony from inverse-modelled MEG / EEG data revealed wide-spread phase synchronization during a visual working memory task. Furthermore, the network architectures of task-related synchrony were found to be segregated over frequency. Cross-frequency interactions were investigated with analyses of nested brain activity in data recorded with full-bandwidth EEG during a somatosensory detection task. According to these data, the phase of ongoing infra-slow fluctuations (ISF), which were discovered in the frequency band of 0.01-0.1 Hz, was correlated with the amplitude of faster > 1 Hz neuronal oscillations. Strikingly, the behavioral detection performance displayed similar dependency on the ISFs as the > 1 Hz neuronal oscillations. The studies composing this Thesis showed that correlations in neuronal oscillations are functionally related to brain disorders and cognitive processing. Such correlations are suggested to reveal the coordination of neuronal oscillations across time, space and frequency. The results contribute to system-level understanding of brain function.
    Translated title of the contributionDynamic correlations in ongoing neuronal oscillations in humans - perspectives on brain function and its disorders
    Original languageEnglish
    QualificationDoctor's degree
    Awarding Institution
    • Aalto University
    Supervisors/Advisors
    • Ilmoniemi, Risto, Supervising Professor
    • Voipio, Juha, Thesis Advisor
    • Palva, J. Matias, Thesis Advisor
    Print ISBNs978-952-60-3114-9
    Electronic ISBNs978-952-60-3115-6
    Publication statusPublished - 2010
    MoE publication typeG5 Doctoral dissertation (article)

    Keywords

    • magnetoencephalography
    • human brain
    • neuronal oscillations
    • epilepsy
    • cognition

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