Does Studying In A Music-Oriented Education Program Affect Non-Native Sound Learning? – Effects Of Passive Auditory Training On Children’s Vowel Production

Katja Immonen, Jemina Kilpeläinen, Paavo Alku, Maija S. Peltola

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

Earlier studies have shown that children are efficient second language learners. Research has also shown that musical background might affect second language learning. A two-day auditory training paradigm was used to investigate whether studying in a music-oriented education program affects children’s sensitivity to acquire a non-native vowel contrast. Training effects were measured with listen-and-repeat production tests. Two groups of monolingual Finnish children (9–11 years, N=23) attending music-oriented and regular fourth grades were tested. The stimuli were two semisynthetic pseudo words /ty:ti/ and /tʉ:ti/ with the native vowel /y/ and the non-native vowel /ʉ/ embedded. Both groups changed their pronunciation after the first training. The change was reflected in the second formant values of /ʉ/, which lowered significantly after three trainings. The results show that 9–11-year-old children benefit from passive auditory training in second language production learning regardless of whether or not they attend a music-oriented education program.
Original languageEnglish
Number of pages10
JournalJOURNAL OF LANGUAGE TEACHING AND RESEARCH
Publication statusAccepted/In press - 2021
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

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