Do routine activities help predict young adults' online harassment: A multi-nation study

Matti Näsi, Pekka Räsänen, Markus Kaakinen, Teo Keipi, Atte Oksanen

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

This study examined the feasibility of routine activity theory in predicting online harassment victimization of people aged 15 to 30 years in the USA, Finland, Germany, and the UK. Logistic regression models controlled for socio-demographic factors, exposure to offender, target suitability, and absence of guardianship. According to the results, between 15 percent and 20 percent of respondents reported having been victims of online harassment. Of routine activity theory variables tested, only exposure to offenders was statistically significant in each of the four countries. Females were more likely to be victims than males in Finland, but not in other countries. Those with an immigrant background had a higher likelihood of being victims in Germany, but not in the other countries, whereas the protective role of guardianship was supported in the USA and Germany. Our findings indicate that while routine activity theory is a useful tool for predicting online victimization, its feasibility varied across countries.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)418-432
Number of pages15
JournalCRIMINOLOGY AND CRIMINAL JUSTICE
Volume17
Issue number4
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Sep 2017
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Keywords

  • Internet
  • multi-nation study
  • online victimization
  • routine activity theory
  • youth
  • LIFE-STYLE
  • VICTIMIZATION
  • YOUTH
  • INTERNET
  • RISK
  • CYBERCRIME
  • TRENDS

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