Determination of critical hydrogen concentration and its effect on mechanical performance of 2200 mpa and 600 hbw martensitic ultra‐high‐strength steel

Eric Fangnon*, Yuriy Yagodzinskyy, Evgenii Malictki, Saara Mehtonen, Esa Virolainen, Pedro Vilaça

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

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Abstract

The influence of hydrogen on the mechanical performance of a hot‐rolled martensitic steel was studied by means of constant extension rate test (CERT) and constant load test (CLT) followed with thermal desorption spectroscopy measurements. The steel shows a reduction in tensile strength up to 25% of ultimate tensile strength (UTS) at critical hydrogen concentrations determined to be about 1.1 wt.ppm and 50% of UTS at hydrogen concentrations of 2 wt.ppm. No further strength degradation was observed up to hydrogen concentrations of 4.8 wt.ppm. It was observed that the interplay between local hydrogen concentrations and local stress states, accompanied with the presence of total average hydrogen reducing the general plasticity of the specimen are responsible for the observed strength degradation of the steel at the critical concentrations of hydrogen. Under CLT, the steel does not show sensitivity to hydrogen at applied loads below 50% of UTS under contin-uous electrochemical hydrogen charging up to 85 h. Hydrogen enhanced creep rates during constant load increased linearly with increasing hydrogen concentration in the steel.

Original languageEnglish
Article number984
Number of pages16
JournalMetals
Volume11
Issue number6
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 20 Jun 2021
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Keywords

  • Constant extension rate test
  • Constant load test
  • Hydrogen embrittlement
  • Thermal desorption spectroscopy
  • Ultra‐high‐strength steels

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