Collocated Sharing of Presentations of Self in Public Settings

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Abstract

Various mobile technologies proofed to enhance peoples collocated social interactions. In particular, user-generated presentations of self have proven beneficial, albeit in specific social settings. This field study interviewed 30 participants for their attitudes towards personal sharing in six public settings in a Nordic metropolitan area. We asked participants to draw what they want to share on an attachable paper sticker. We observed retention towards sharing in places with a more heterogeneous audience. Predominantly people’s attitudes towards sharing depended on an individual’s current context. Our results highlight the symbolic act of sharing in public as a factor for placing personal public displays. Further, we suggest leveraging the different strategies of extroverts and introverts for collocated social interactions.
Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationMUM 2020 - 19th International Conference on Mobile and Ubiquitous Multimedia, Proceedings
EditorsJessica Cauchard, Markus Lochtefeld
Place of PublicationNew York, NY, USA
PublisherACM
Pages191–200
Number of pages10
ISBN (Electronic)9781450388702
ISBN (Print)9781450388702
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 22 Nov 2020
MoE publication typeA4 Article in a conference publication
EventInternational Conference on Mobile and Ubiquitous Multimedia - Essen, Germany
Duration: 22 Nov 202025 Nov 2020
Conference number: 19
http://www.mum-conf.org/2020/

Conference

ConferenceInternational Conference on Mobile and Ubiquitous Multimedia
Abbreviated titleMUM 2020
CountryGermany
CityEssen
Period22/11/202025/11/2020
Internet address

Keywords

  • Wearable Computing
  • Personal Information
  • Augmented Reality
  • Self-presentation
  • Personal Public Displays
  • Face-to-face Interaction
  • Social Context

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