Bridging divergent institutional logics through intermediation practices: Insights from a developing country context

Jarkko Levänen*, Sara Lindeman, Minna Halme, Matti Tervo, Tatu Lyytinen

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

7 Citations (Scopus)
70 Downloads (Pure)

Abstract

Poverty reduction is critical for global socio-political stability. In this paper we start from the observation that divergent institutional logics may indirectly uphold conditions of poverty. We focus on the intermediation practices of an organization working in Tanzania to deepen collaboration between forest sector stakeholders. Our findings show how operational inefficiencies in the forest sector perpetuate the deprivation of low-income populations and how increased intermediation can help to reduce such inefficiencies. We identify intermediation practices that create learning, clarity and synthesis and so help to overcome key differences between divergent institutional logics. The notion of intermediation practices helps not only to understand the work of intermediaries, but also to explain how operational environments need to be developed to achieve poverty reduction and sustainable development.

Original languageEnglish
Article number121443
Number of pages15
JournalTechnological Forecasting and Social Change
Volume176
Early online date28 Dec 2021
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Mar 2022
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Keywords

  • Developing country
  • Forest management
  • Institutional logic
  • Intermediation
  • Poverty reduction
  • Practice

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