Brain-computer interface research at Katholieke Universiteit Leuven

Nikolay V. Manyakov*, Nikolay Chumerin, Adrien Combaz, Arne Robben, Marijn van Vliet, Patrick A. De Mazière, Marc M. Van Hulle

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Chapter in Book/Report/Conference proceedingConference contributionScientificpeer-review

3 Citations (Scopus)

Abstract

We present an overview of our Brain-computer interface (BCI) research, invasive as well as non-invasive, during the past four years. The invasive BCIs are based on local field-and action potentials recorded with microelectrode arrays implanted in the visual cortex of the macaque monkey. The non-invasive BCIs are based on electroencephalogram (EEG) recorded from a human subject's scalp. Several EEG paradigms were used to enable the subject to type text or to select icons on a computer screen, without having to rely on one's fingers, gestures, or any other form of motor activity: the P300 event-related potential, the steady-state visual evoked potential, and the error related potential. We report on the status of our EEG BCI tests on healthy subjects as well as patients with severe communication disabilities, and our demonstrations to a broad audience to raise the public awareness of BCI.

Original languageEnglish
Title of host publicationProceedings of the 4th International Symposium on Applied Sciences in Biomedical and Communication Technologies, ISABEL'11
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - 1 Dec 2011
MoE publication typeA4 Article in a conference publication
EventINTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON APPLIED SCIENCES IN BIOMEDICAL AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES - Barcelona, Spain
Duration: 31 Dec 189929 Oct 2011
Conference number: 4

Conference

ConferenceINTERNATIONAL SYMPOSIUM ON APPLIED SCIENCES IN BIOMEDICAL AND COMMUNICATION TECHNOLOGIES
Abbreviated titleISABEL
CountrySpain
CityBarcelona
Period31/12/189929/10/2011

Keywords

  • action potentials
  • brain-computer interface
  • electroencephalogram
  • local field potentials

Fingerprint

Dive into the research topics of 'Brain-computer interface research at Katholieke Universiteit Leuven'. Together they form a unique fingerprint.

Cite this