Are Strategic Communication Management Competencies and Personal Attributes Global? A Case Study of Practice in Finland and New Zealand

Margaret Brunton*, Anne Kankaanranta, Leena Louhiala-Salminen, Lynn Jeffrey

*Corresponding author for this work

Research output: Contribution to journalArticleScientificpeer-review

Abstract

The drive to both maintain competitiveness and to meet marketplace expectations using the strategic management of communication is a feature of the international workplace. In the complex and dynamic commercial environment of the new millennium, this drive includes the imperatives to employ competent communication professionals. Whether organizations are intent on acquiring or developing proficient practitioners, the ability to achieve these aims rests on the identification of relevant competencies and attributes. This study uses the Critical Incident Technique to explore the practice of Communication Management in a sample of practitioners in New Zealand and Finland-two geographically disperse countries. The identified critical incidents mostly related to managing crisis communication across both countries. To manage the incidents, communication practitioners predominantly used two competencies: stakeholder relationship management and external interface management. In addition, the personal attribute of adaptability was most commonly employed in both countries. Despite the similarity of incidents and the competencies and attributes required to manage them, also variability in practitioners' strategic and personal responses was evident.

Original languageEnglish
Pages (from-to)151-172
Number of pages22
JournalInternational Journal of Business Communication
Volume56
Issue number2
DOIs
Publication statusPublished - Apr 2019
MoE publication typeA1 Journal article-refereed

Keywords

  • communication management
  • competencies
  • personal attributes
  • critical incidents

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