Agricultural extension, intra-household allocation and malaria

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Agricultural extension, intra-household allocation and malaria. / Pan, Yao; Singhal, Saurabh.

In: JOURNAL OF DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS, Vol. 139, 01.06.2019, p. 157-170.

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@article{e3aa1b48b36147a2b28e11765d48cc75,
title = "Agricultural extension, intra-household allocation and malaria",
abstract = "Can agricultural development programs improve health-related outcomes? We exploit a spatial discontinuity in the coverage of a large-scale agricultural extension program in Uganda to causally identify its effects on malaria. We find that eligibility for the program reduced the proportion of household members with malaria by 8.9 percentage points, with children and pregnant women experiencing substantial improvements. An examination of the underlying mechanisms indicates that an increase in income and the resulting increase in the ownership and usage of bednets may have played a role. Taken together, these results signify the importance of financial constraints in investments for malaria prevention and the potential role that agricultural development can play in easing it.",
keywords = "Agricultural extension, Intra-household allocation, Malaria, Regression discontinuity, Uganda",
author = "Yao Pan and Saurabh Singhal",
year = "2019",
month = "6",
day = "1",
doi = "10.1016/j.jdeveco.2019.03.006",
language = "English",
volume = "139",
pages = "157--170",
journal = "JOURNAL OF DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS",
issn = "0304-3878",
publisher = "Elsevier",

}

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TY - JOUR

T1 - Agricultural extension, intra-household allocation and malaria

AU - Pan, Yao

AU - Singhal, Saurabh

PY - 2019/6/1

Y1 - 2019/6/1

N2 - Can agricultural development programs improve health-related outcomes? We exploit a spatial discontinuity in the coverage of a large-scale agricultural extension program in Uganda to causally identify its effects on malaria. We find that eligibility for the program reduced the proportion of household members with malaria by 8.9 percentage points, with children and pregnant women experiencing substantial improvements. An examination of the underlying mechanisms indicates that an increase in income and the resulting increase in the ownership and usage of bednets may have played a role. Taken together, these results signify the importance of financial constraints in investments for malaria prevention and the potential role that agricultural development can play in easing it.

AB - Can agricultural development programs improve health-related outcomes? We exploit a spatial discontinuity in the coverage of a large-scale agricultural extension program in Uganda to causally identify its effects on malaria. We find that eligibility for the program reduced the proportion of household members with malaria by 8.9 percentage points, with children and pregnant women experiencing substantial improvements. An examination of the underlying mechanisms indicates that an increase in income and the resulting increase in the ownership and usage of bednets may have played a role. Taken together, these results signify the importance of financial constraints in investments for malaria prevention and the potential role that agricultural development can play in easing it.

KW - Agricultural extension

KW - Intra-household allocation

KW - Malaria

KW - Regression discontinuity

KW - Uganda

UR - http://www.scopus.com/inward/record.url?scp=85063341071&partnerID=8YFLogxK

U2 - 10.1016/j.jdeveco.2019.03.006

DO - 10.1016/j.jdeveco.2019.03.006

M3 - Article

VL - 139

SP - 157

EP - 170

JO - JOURNAL OF DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS

JF - JOURNAL OF DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS

SN - 0304-3878

ER -

ID: 34747482